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Testimonials

In the various roles he has undertaken through the years, Val J. Halamandaris has been a singular driving force behind the policy and program initiatives resulting in the recognition of home health care as a viable alternative to institutionalization. His dedication to consumer advocacy, which enhances the quality of life and dignity of those receiving home health care, merits VNA HealthCare Group’s highest recognition and deepest respect. 

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VNA HealthCare Group

I have the highest respect for them, especially for the nurses, aides and therapists, who devote their lives to caring for people with disabilities, the infirm and dying Americans.  There are few more noble professions.

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President Barack Obama

Home health care agencies do such a wonderful job in this country helping people to be able to remain at home and allowing them to receive services

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U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) Chair, Democratic Steering and Outreach Committee

Home care is a combination of compassion and efficiency.  It is less expensive than institutional care...but at the same time it is a more caring, human, intimate experience, and therefore it has a greater human element...it’s a big mistake not to try to maximize it and find ways to give people the home care option over either nursing homes, hospitals or other institutions

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Former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Newt Gingrich (R-GA)

Medicaid covers long-term care, but only for low-income families.  And Medicare only pays for care that is connected to a hospital discharge....our health care system must cover these vital services...[and] we should promote home-based care, which most people prefer, instead of the institutional care that we emphasize now.

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Former U.S. Senator Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-CD)

We need incentives to...keep people in home health care settings...It’s dramatically less expensive than long term care.

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U.S. Senator John McCain (R-AZ)

 

Home care is clearly the wave of the future. It’s clearly where patients want to be cared for. I come from an ethnic family and when a member of our family is severely ill, we would never consider taking them to get institutional care. That’s true of many families for both cultural and financial reasons. If patients have a choice of where they want to be cared for, where it’s done the right way, they choose home.

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Donna Shalala, former Secretary of Health and Human Services

A couple of years ago, I spent a little bit of time with the National Association for Home Care & Hospice and its president, Val J. Halamandaris, and I was just blown away. What impressed me so much was that they talked about what they do as opposed to just the strategies of how to deal with Washington or Sacramento or Albany or whatever the case may be. Val is a fanatic about care, and it comes through in every way known to mankind. It comes through in the speakers he invites to their events; it comes through in all the stuff he shares.

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Tom Peters, author of In Search of Excellence

Val’s home care organization brings thousands of caregivers together into a dynamic organization that provides them with valuable resources and tools to be even better in their important work. He helps them build self-esteem, which leads to self-motivation.

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Mike Vance, former Dean of Disney and author of Think Out of the Box

Val is one of the greatest advocates for seniors in America. He goes beyond the call of duty every time.

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Arthur S. Flemming, former Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare

Val has brought the problems, the challenges, and the opportunities out in the open for everyone to look at. He is a visionary pointing the direction for us. 

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Margaret (Peg) Cushman, Professor of Nursing and former President of the Visiting Nurses Association

Although Val has chosen to stay in the background, he deserves much of the credit for what was accomplished both at the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging, where he was closely associated with me and at the House Select Committee on Aging, where he was Congressman Claude Pepper’s senior counsel and closest advisor. He put together more hearings on the subject of aging, wrote more reports, drafted more bills, and had more influence on the direction of events than anyone before him or since.

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Frank E. Moss, former U.S. Senator

Val’s most important contribution is pulling together all elements of home health care and being able to organize and energize the people involved in the industry.

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Frank E. Moss, former U.S. Senator

Anyone working on health care issues in Congress knows the name Val J. Halamandaris.

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Kathleen Gardner Cravedi, former Staff Director of the House Select Committee on Aging

Without your untiring support and active participation, the voices of people advocating meaningful and compassionate health care reform may not have been heard by national leaders.

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Michael Sullivan, Former Executive Director, Indiana Association for Home Care

All of us have been members of many organizations and NAHC is simply the best there is. NAHC aspires to excellence in every respect; its staff has been repeatedly honored as the best in Washington; the organization lives by the highest values and has demonstrated a passionate interest in the well-being of patients and providers.

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Elaine Stephens, Director of Home Care of Steward Home Care/Steward Health Systems and former NAHC C

Home care increasingly is one of the basic building blocks in the developing system of long-term care.  On both economic and recuperative bases, home health care will continue to grow as an essential service for individuals, for families and for the community as a whole.

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Former U.S. Senator Olympia Snowe (R-ME)

NCOA is excited to be part of this great event and honored to have such influential award winners in the field of aging.

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National Council of Aging

Health care at home…is something we need more of, not less of.  Let us make a commitment to preventive and long-term care.  Let us encourage home care as an alternative to nursing homes and give folks a little help to have their parents there.

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Former President Bill Clinton

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Educational Session Descriptions by Time


100 Series, October 28, 4:30-5:30pm Back to Top

101-How to Work with Hospitals to Provide Better Care for Patients who have Joint Replacement Surgery

Discharging patients to their homes after elective joint replacement surgery (EJRS) has been shown to provide efficient clinical outcomes, as well as cost savings. In 2012, the Joint Replacement Center and Montefiore Home Care initiated a collaboration to increase the number of patients discharged home for rehab services. The goal of the collaboration was to decrease the length of hospital stay, improve pre-operative teaching, and reduce utilization of sub-acute services.

Objectives:

  • Discuss the need to implement specialized programs
  • Describe how to develop a program
  • Illustrate a collaborative approach in primary care and hospital settings

Faculty: Angela Schonberg, MPT, Assistant Director Business Development, Montefiore Home Care, Bronx, NY; Wojciech Rymarowicz, MPT, Director of Rehabilitation, Montefiore Home Care, Bronx, NY; Amy Ehrlich, MD, Medical Director, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); Approved for 1.0; 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Clinical


102-How to Grow Revenue

Revenue growth is critical to agencies in today's health care environment. While reimbursement cuts have required agencies to reduce expenses, there are limits to the effectiveness of such reductions. Agencies must increase revenue to offset the reductions and continue adapting to the changes happening in the current market. This program contains information on a number of strategies developed by members of the HHFMA Innovations Committee drawn from diverse home care operators.

Objectives:

  • Explain how to maximize the value of a PPS episode
  • Describe ways to grow viable commercial and managed care revenues
  • Review strategies for increasing revenue by developing and participating in new payment models, such as bundling and accountable care

Faculty: Jeffrey Aspacher, VP, Finance, Home Care Division, Community Health Systems, Franklin, TN; M. Aaron Little, CPA, Managing Consultant, BKD, LLP, Springfield, MO; Rob Simione, BS, CPA,Vice President of the Finanical Monitor, Simione Healthcare Consultants, Nick Seabrook, BS, Managing Director, BlackTree Healthcare Consulting, Co PA ; Beau Sorensen, BA, COO ,First Choice Home Health and Hospice, Orem, UT

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Financial


103-How to Maximize Technology to Improve Care and Reduce Cost

Technology is increasingly needed in health care as we all strive to avoid reimbursement penalties. Unfortunately, we’re struggling to find easy success with the new technologies, and less than half of us are satisfied. Luckily, we can learn from those who have had success, like Justine Garcia and Justin Miller from Jordan Health Systems, which invested in technology that analyzes their EMR data allowing them to more effectively coordinate care. This program will review the state of the healthcare technology industry, adoption challenges and potential solutions with real life case examples.

Objectives:

  • Describe the current status of technology in health care
  • Explain best practices for technology adoption and integration/li>
  • Discuss Jordan Health Services success in using technology by aligning with people and processes

Faculty: Justine Garcia, BA, Director of Software Solutions, Jordan Health Services, Addison, TX; Justin Miller, Director of  Synergy,  Jordan Health Services, Addison, TX; Cyndi Rizzitello, MSN, RN, BC, SVP of Client Experience, Medalogix, Nashville, TN

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Technology


104-How to be Ready for Your Hospice Survey

The IMPACT Act requires each Medicare-certified hospice to undergo a survey at least once every 36 months. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and state survey agencies have been gearing up to tackle the increase in surveys. Has your hospice been getting ready, too? The session will review CMS’s plans to implement the IMPACT Act and walk you through the hospice federal recertification survey process, including steps surveyors will take and the reports, forms, and documents hospices should have available at each of these steps. The session will also offer advice on how to handle concerns identified by surveyors and how to manage the survey process. For instance, what should a hospice be prepared to provide a surveyor during the entrance interview and how much time does the hospice have to supply the surveyor with information?

Objectives:

  • Review CMS’s plans for implementing the IMPACT Act
  • Discuss each step surveyors should take and how hospices are expected to respond from entrance interview to exit interview
  • List the forms, reports, and documents hospices should have “at the ready” for CMS recertification surveys
  • Share tips for handling concerns that arise during a survey

Faculty: Katie Wehri, CHC, CHPC, Hospice Operations Expert, National Association for Home Care & Hospice, Washington, DC

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Hospice


105-How to Train Management to Create a Just Culture

Having a just culture is the key to knowing what to do when employees make mistakes and don’t consistently act according to your health care policies, procedures, and values. This session will show health care managers how to create a learning culture that produces the best possible outcomes, foster openness and fairness, and avoid overly punitive reactions to adverse events and errors.

Objectives:

  • Describe how to build a learning culture that produces the best possible outcomes
  • Discuss ways to promote openness and fairness and avoid overly punitive reactions to adverse events and errors
  • Discuss ways to design safe systems
  • Review ways to manage behavioral choices

Faculty: Melinda Ward, BS, MHA, NHA, Executive Director, John Knox Village, Lee's Summit, MO

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/PHR); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Human Resources


106-How to Overhaul Your Internal Structure to Be Prepared for the New HHCoPs

CMS's new rule for home health agencies constitutes a major shift in the regulations. Changes in the HHCoPs may require HHAs to overhaul their internal structures, especially with the new focus on quality assessment and performance improvement (QAPI). As CMS gears up to propose rules for mandatory provider compliance programs, learn how you can incorporate compliance and ethics activities into your QAPI program, integrate HHCoPs within your compliance program, and appreciate the difference.

Objectives:

  • State at least two major changes in the new proposed HHCoPs
  • Identify one main focus of the HHCoPs, one main focus of the OIG compliance programs, and one focus they have in common
  • Review and discuss OIG’s current expectations for an agency or provider’s corporate ethics and compliance program, as well as the difference between compliance with OIG and compliance with HHCoPs.

Faculty: Kathleen Spooner, RN, BSN, Director of Operations/General Manager, Home Health, ResCare, Inc., Lithia, FL; Kathleen Hessler, RN, JD, Director, Compliance & Risk, Simione Healthcare Consultants, Albuquerque, NM

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Legal & Regulatory


107-How to Use Lean Principles to Drive Organizational Excellence

This presentation will give practical examples of how to reduce waste in your system processes in order to focus on excellent operations and delivery of high-quality care to clients. When well executed, lean principles can transform quality for the better and create a culture of continuous improvement. We will provide a template for leaders to implement lean management philosophy in assessing their current state, identifying areas where they need to reduce inefficiency, and ensuring their focus is on clients.

Objectives:

  • Discuss lean principles, the tools available for using them, and how to apply the right ones in health care
  • Describe practical examples of excellent operations and how to transform your organization and processes
  • Explain how the use of lean tools can make your processes more efficient and reduce costs without sacrificing quality

Faculty: Jo-anne Stone-Burke, BA, National Director of Strategic Transformation, Revera Home Health, Toronto, ON

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/BMO); 1.0 Adm. CEs (NAB/NCERS); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Management & Leadership


108-How to Power up Your Agency, Your Income, and your Sales Team!

Learn how to manage your sales team and never make a no-value sales call again! This program will provide you with the tools necessary to skyrocket your referrals and profits. We will demonstrate trigger questions to help referral sources identify patients who qualify and can benefit from the services your home health, hospice, or private duty organization can provide. Learn how to change your message when your audience changes.

Objectives:

  • Identify your agency’s unique selling points
  • Create your 52-week calendar of goals
  • Discuss methods for training and teaching your sales reps

Faculty: Cheryl Peltekis, RN, Vice President and Clinical Director, Immediate Home Care and Hospice, Bensalem, PA; Melanie Stover, BS, OTR/L, MBA, MS/ISM, President, Home Care Sales By Power Shot Training, Albuquerque, NM

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/MKT); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Marketing & Business Development


109-How to Solve New Challenges in Home Care

The last two years have brought in many regulatory changes. Some of those changes include the companionship, live-in, and white-collar exemptions. Others relate to contractor classification, the Family Medical Leave Act, and the increased number of audits by oversight bodies. To be in compliance, home care agencies must understand the new rules, and modify or change their current processes in accordance with the new demands. In addition, they would do well to anticipate other changes that may occur.

Objectives:

  • Explain changes to the companionship and live-in exemptions, along with agency requirements during the appeals process
  • Discuss issues stemming from Labor Department requirements for white-collar exemptions and classification of contractors
  • Describe changes to the FMLA

Faculty: Patricia Drea, RN, BSN, MPA, CEO, Visiting Angels, Tega Cay, SC

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Private Duty


110-How Nursing Knowledge can make a Difference in Client Outcomes

The impact of nursing knowledge on clients’ outcome improvement scores is elusive. A study of nine home health agencies in Ohio was conducted to explain how these agencies use nursing knowledge to raise outcome improvement scores. The audience will be able to formulate ideas for using this information in staff development, new performance improvement processes, and clinical ladder projects. Understanding the effect of nursing knowledge on patient outcome scores can assist home health agencies in understanding how to support nurses in providing quality care.

Objectives:

  • Describe the purpose of the Ohio research project of nine agencies
  • Review the research process
  • Explain the research findings

Faculty: Tammy Nuesmeyer, RN, MSN, Home Health Director, St Rita's Home Health/LVNA, Lima, OH; Laurie Bladen, RN, PhD, MBA, Instructor, Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Quality
 

200 Series, October 29, 11:15am-12:15pm Back to Top

201-How to Integrate Behavioral Health Screening and Treatment Programs in Home Health Care

Mental health disorders are prevalent in older adults, especially those receiving home health services. Older adults are likely to receive help from a mental health specialist but home care agencies can assist in this process. We will describe a model for providing mental health services to a geriatric population within a home care agency. The program will demonstrate how this agency trained clinicians to screen for depression and other mental health issues while including a psychiatrist in the home care team.

Objectives:

  • Describe how a home care agency can implement a behavioral health program
  • Define the goals of a behavioral program within a home care agency
  • Describe the positive outcomes of incorporating behavioral health in a medical model

Faculty: Janice Korenblatt, LCSW, Director of Social Work, Montefiore Home Care, Bronx, NY; Mirnova Ceide, MD, Assistant Professor of Geriatric Psychiatry, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Clinical


202-How to Analyze and Contain Costs

Home care managers face the challenge of maintaining profitable operations while improving patient outcomes. This will require an understanding of all costs and how they relate to different reimbursement models. This program will equip you to better measure all costs of your operation and compare them to industry benchmarks.

Objectives:

  • Identify direct and indirect costs and understand the relationship of costs to multiple reimbursement models
  • Gain a better understanding of non-clinical and back-office costs and to evaluate operational cost structures compared to industry benchmarks
  • Evaluate operational cost structures compared to industry benchmarks

Faculty: Walter Borginis, CPA, MBA, President and CEO, Visiting Nurse Association of Greater Philadelphia; Andrea Devoti, MSN, MBA, CHCE, President, Neighborhood Health, West Chester, PA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Financial


203-How to Make a Plan for IT Optimization and be Ready for the Future

This presentation will help agencies analyze their current practices with their operational software. We will provide specific recommendations and best practices to ensure your agency is receiving the maximum benefit from its investment. Learn why your agency may not be getting the most benefit from your software resource and what you can do to guarantee successful implementation and use of your agency software program.

Objectives:

  • Review seven steps to achieve an optimal ROI on home care and hospice software
  • Identify why agencies fail to make the best use of software
  • Define where technology is heading, so your organization can think strategically

Faculty: Beau Sorensen, BA, COO, First Choice Home Health and Hospice, Orem, UT; Angela Zeringue, BS, Director of Market Segment, Homecare, Allscripts, Prairieville, LA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Technology


204-How to Implement an Acuity Rating System in Your Hospice Agency

This program will show how you can use information captured through your EHR to calculate acuity and better evaluate patient needs. This trending and benchmarking will allow the organization to build a sustainable business model, develop performance improvement plans, and be prepared for the population it serves.

Objectives:

  • Define patient acuity by the numbers
  • Calculate patient acuity
  • Evaluate operational opportunities where knowing patient acuity can be used

Faculty: Allison Maughn, MBA, CALA, Director of Implementation, Suncoast Solutions, Clearwater, FL;  Teresa R. Craig, BBA, CPA,  CEO of North America, Care Monitoring 2000, LLC, Clearwater, FL

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Hospice


206-How to Stay Informed: Updates from Palmetto

Palmetto GBA is the Medicare administrative contractor for many home health and hospice agencies in the US. This program will include information on the most recent Medicare regulatory updates and changes. Participants will also learn about some available tools and resources that will allow them to better implement processes to ensure compliance with the regulations. In addition, participants will increase their knowledge of electronic data interchange (EDI) functions and processes.

Objectives:

  • Explain electronic data interchange (EDI) functions and processes
  • Apply knowledge of available tools and resources to ensure compliance with Medicare regulations
  • Identify and discuss Medicare program changes

Faculty: Kim Campbell, BS, MA, MHP, Manager, EDI Operations; Daniel George, Senior Provider Relations Representative; Charles Canaan MPH, BSN, RN, Senior Provider Education Consultant; all from Palmetto, GBA, Columbia, SC

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Legal & Regulatory


207- How to be Ready for Future Success: A Presidents’ Forum

Hear the predictions of nationally prominent presidents representing health systems, VNAs, and for-profit and publicly traded companies, along with a leading consulting firm. This provocative forum has been updated from the popular 2015 session. Faculty will debate diversification strategies, describe what success will look like in 2015 and 2016 and discuss the implementation of health care reform, cost reduction strategies, and much more!

Objectives:

  • Interpret the impact of payer and care delivery changes
  • Gain strategic information on what success looks like for growing organizations
  • Demonstrate specific tactics to take as CEOs

Faculty: Jeannee Parker Martin, RN, MPH, Vice Chairman and Principal, The Corridor Group Holdings, San Francisco , CA; Marcia Reissig, RN, MS, CHCE, Chief Executive Officer, Sutter Care at Home, Fairfield, CA; Mark Heaney, President, Addus HealthCare, Palentine, IL; April Anthony, BBA, Chief Executive Officer, Encompass Home Health, Dallas, TX

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/BMO); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Management & Leadership


208-How to Survive the Continuum Consolidation

Cost-saving measures in PPACA, ACOs, bundled payments, and so on are leading to more consolidation along the continuum of health care. This consolidation makes it very important to pursue strategic partnerships with acute-care and other long-term care providers. Based on the experience of one agency, this session will help providers prepare for consolidation by reviewing the legal, financial, and operational aspects of this relationship, as well as considerations for identifying partners.

Objectives:

  • Identify the legal and regulatory changes that drive reform and why they make partnering with acute care providers, ACOs, and others a necessary strategy
  • Describe how the requirements of these models relate to home care, which entities you can best assist, and how to use data to make a convincing case
  • Explain the key legal, regulatory, and operational considerations in establishing a joint venture so you will not be surprised as you enter into life with a partner

Faculty: Robert Markette, JD, CHC, Of Counsel, Hall, Render,Killian, Heath & Lyman, P.C., Indianapolis, IN; Valerie Landell, RNC, BSN, President and CEO, Visiting Nurse Association of Greater Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/BMO); 1.0 Adm. CEs (NAB/NCERS); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Marketing & Business Development


209-How to Recruit Successfully for Private Duty Care

To provide attendees with strategies, tools and resources for consideration in developing or enhancing their recruitment plan to ultimately attract, hire and retain qualified caregivers to meet the ever-increasing demands for care needs with minimal turnover and associated costs. Presentation includes discussion of the recruitment process, measurements for implementation to trend and monitor success, and the importance of sound retention tactics. 

Objectives:

  • Provide a better understanding of recruitment process flow and identify recruitment sources, selection tools and strategies to consider to improve outcomes
  • Discuss operational measurements for implementation to track and monitor effectiveness and accountability of recruitment/retention efforts
  • Offer suggestions to improve caregiver retention through best practicesand data-driven documentation to reduce recruitment needs

Faculty: Georjean Sweis, MBA, Director, Vising Angels, Living Assistance Services, Naperville, IL

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Private Duty


210-How to Go Beyond “Safe” in Providing Home Therapy Assessments

The current focus on quality-based reimbursement means home health is in need of evidence-based practice resources. Standardizing home assessments will support OASIS accuracy, therapy utilization, and quality-improvement activities. This program will help agencies develop practice patterns that drive better clinical service utilization and decision making through improved analysis of assessment data.

Objectives:

  • Identify key elements of comprehensive home/environmental assessment
  • Use home/environmental assessment findings to enhance OASIS-C1 accuracy
  • Discuss implementation strategies to drive clinical service utilization decision making

Faculty: Diana Kornetti, BS, PT, MA, Chief Operations Officer, Kornetti & Krafft Health Care Solutions, Citrus Springs, FL; Leslie Grant, PhD., Associate Professor and Director, Center for Aging Management, Minneapolis, MN; Cindy Krafft, PT, MS, Chief Executive Officer, Kornetti & Krafft Health Care Solutions, Citrus Springs, FL

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); Approved for 1.0; 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Quality


Anchor211-How to Interpret the Home Health Value Based Purchasing Program

The proposed rule for the 2016 home health prospective payment rate update implements a home health value based purchasing (VBP)  program. This session will outline and examine the rationale and construct of the program. The reward and penalty methodology, proposed quality measures, selected states for participation and the potential implications for agencies will be discussed.

Objectives:

  • Describe the rational behind CMS’ proposal for a HH VBP program
  • Describe the construct of the VBP program
  • Identify the impact on HH operations

Faculty: Mary Carr, RN, MPH, Vice President, Regulatory Affairs; William Dombi, Esq., VP for Law, Executive Director, HHFMA, Director, Center for Health Care Law, both from National Association for Home Care & Hospice, Washington, DC

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Legal & Regulatory

 300 Series, October 29, 2:30-3:30pm Back to Top

301-How to Partner with Hospitals to Prevent Re-hospitalizations

Two organizations undertook a two-year journey to ensure the smooth post-acute transition of an identified population. The goal of their partnership was to ensure family involvement, patient and staff satisfaction, and quality outcomes. This was an experience that showed how a team can leave egos at the door to have an unprecedented experience of collaboration.

Objectives:

  • Have an understanding of the history that led up to establishing this collaborative project, including the expected outcomes
  • Identify factor that contributed to high readmission rate for colorectal patients as identified through a Root Cause Analysis (RCA)
  • Discuss the people and processes needed to put together an “effective” action team process
  • Identify the process metrics established for the project
  • Discuss the formal role out of the PAC project-combined effort St. Francis ACO (January 2015)
  • Discuss the plan activities to sustain

Faculty: Dr. Susan Adams, RN, BSN, MHSA, PhD, Vice President of Alliance Integration for Masonicare, Masonic Home Health & Hospice, Wallingford, CT; Ann Orr, MS, RN, Performance Improvement Facilitator, St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Hartford, CT

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0 Adm. CEs (NAB/NCERS); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Clinical


302-How to Optimize Your Revenue Cycle in an Era of Value-Based Care

As value-based care reimbursement models continue to gain traction, provider organizations need to optimize their revenue cycle to reduce costs while providing quality care. Attendees will learn how to implement a combination of technology and process improvements to reduce denials, increase collections, and maximize financial performance in the new health care environment.

Objectives:

  • Identify the challenges to managing revenue cycles in increasingly complex reimbursement models
  • Examine how to meet the challenges of value-based care by implementing revenue cycle best practices
  • Discuss how to leverage a combination of technologies and processes to establish a real-time link between financial and clinical aspects of the revenue cycle

Faculty: Raj Shetye, MBA, Senior Vice President & Chief Information Officer, LHC Group, Lafayette, LA; Keith Ricards, MBA, Group Project anger, ZirMed, Louisville, KY

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Financial


303-How to Use Cloud Technology to Reduce Costs and Improve Compliance

Rebasing has forced agencies to evaluate how their back-office infrastructure and employee productivity affect the bottom line. Learn how Gaffey Home Nursing & Hospice strategically formulated and executed a plan to improve back-office processes, reduce costs, and improve compliance. Their core focus on people, processes, and technology led to reduced cost per episode, enabling the agency to increase profit margins, streamline job processes, and thereby focus more on patient care.

Objectives:

  • Develop and set a baseline to determine if investments in technology are producing effective results
  • Identify compliance and process gaps to reduce potential breaches and costs
  • Explain how cloud technology can be a reliable resource for improving compliance

Faculty: Kim Gaffey, BSN, CEO & Founder, Gaffey Home Nursing & Hospice, Sterling, IL; Craig Mandeville, BS, CEO & Founder, Forcura, Jacksonville, FL

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.6 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Technology


304-How to Integrate Palliative Care Into Your Community-Based Home Health and Hospice Programs

This session will look at the development and implementation of palliative care in community-based home health and hospice programs. We will share our successes and lessons learned about clinical services, operations, and finances as they relate to developing business.

Objectives:

  • Discuss definitions, gaps, and model characteristics that support progressive illness through a palliative care intervention
  • Describe the process of integration
  • Describe and explain the lessons learned from Interim's integration of palliative care into home health and hospice

Faculty: Robert Parker, RN, MSN, CHPN, Director of Palliative Care, Interim Healthcare, Lockhart, TX

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Hospice


305-How to Develop An International Recruitment Program

Despite aggressive local and regional efforts, recruitment oftentimes remains a challenge. For some agencies the recruitment of internationally trained RNs and therapists is a great option. Session participants will learn how to determine if international recruitment is a good option for their agency, select a good agency, interview and select the best candidates, and understand what resources should be used to acculturate and clinically onboard the candidates.

Objectives:

  • Evaluate whether international recruitment is a good option for your agency
  • Describe the immigration timelines and visa types 
  • Demonstrate how to interview and select the best candidates

Faculty: Krista Bramlage, Business Development Director, PassportUSA, Cincinnati, OH; Daniel Kevorkian, PT, MSPT, Director of Rehab Development Program, AccentCare Home Health, College Grove, TN

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/PHR); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Human Resources


306-How to Stay Informed: Medicare Updates From CGS

CGS, the Medicare administrative contractor for Jurisdiction 15 will discuss recent or impending Medicare changes affecting home health and hospice agencies. Participants will gain advanced knowledge about the most common reasons home health and hospice claims are rejected or returned and learn how to identify resources to assist in resolving these billing issues and errors. Time is allotted for Q & As during this session.

Objectives:

  • Discuss recent or impending Medicare changes affecting home health and hospice agencies
  • Review the most common reasons home health and hospice claims are rejected or returned to the provider for correction
  • List resources to assist in resolving common home health and hospice provider billing issues and errors

Faculty: Nykesha Scales, BS, Senior Provider Relations Representative, CGS Administrators, LLC, Des Moines, IA; Sandy Decker, BSN, Senior Provider Education Consultant, CGS Administrators, LLC, Des Moines, IA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE); Approved for 1.0; 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Legal & Regulatory


307-How to Build a Case Management System that Leads to Success

Learn how to adopt a case management model driven by goals instead of the less effective task-oriented approach many agencies take. The keys to this successful model are planning care in a proactive way and having the multidisciplinary team collaborate throughout the entire episode. Taking these steps will boost productivity, outcomes, and the bottom line, besides increasing customer and employee satisfaction. It’s all simple when you know the secrets for implementing a case management system that works.  

Objectives:

  • Describe a case management model that meets individual patient needs and increases their outcomes
  • Explain the importance of ongoing, documented communication among the members of the interdisciplinary team
  • Show how to increase patient outcomes

Faculty: Sheryl Bellinger, MA, BSN, RN, CHCA, Administrator, Professional Home Health Care, Inc., Niwot, CO; Sharon Litwin, RN, BSHS, MHA, HCS-DL, Senior Managing Partner, 5 Star Consultants, LLC, Camdenton, MO

Course Level: Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/BMO); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Management & Leadership


308-How to Create Successful Programs through Payer / Provider Collaboration

Learn how the Institute on Aging in San Francisco, CA, collaborated with local health plans to transition their members into available home and community-based settings that support independent living.

Objectives:

  • Demonstrate how to develop a creative care management model that can be sold to health plans
  • Organize a continuum of care that can achieve outcomes
  • Evaluate and assess appropriate health technology partners that can support this new revenue stream

Faculty: Roxana Blades, MBA, Chief Financial Officer, Institute on Aging, San Francisco, CA; Dustin Harper, MBA, Vice President, Community Living Programs, Institute on Aging, San Francisco, CA; Jeremy Crow, EMBA, PMP, Vice President, Customer Care, Procura, Boca Raton, FL

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/MKT); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Marketing & Business Development


309-How to Respond to New Legal Challenges

Is your agency struggling to understand and comply with the many changes affecting private duty today? This presentation will provide you with the latest information on proposed changes to the white-collar exemption, travel time and pay, independent contractor vs. employee, common wage and hour problems, HIPAA, and risks relating to mobile devices. Learn the strategies that will help you and your business navigate through these industry-wide changes.

Objectives:

  • Review proposed changes in the white-collar exemption and definition of independent contractor vs. employee
  • Discuss how to comply with common problems relating to travel time, wages, and hours
  • Explain how to comply with HIPAA requirements

Faculty: John Gilliland, JD, Attorney, The Gilliland Law Firm, PC, Indianapolis, IN; Patricia Drea, BSN, MPA, COO, Visiting Angels, Taga Cay, SC

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Legal & Regulatory


310-How to Design a Quality Clinical Model that Drives Financial Outcomes

Achieve high-quality care and a positive bottom line. Implement a clinical management structure based on outcomes data and internal clinical protocols that ensure appropriate clinical staff oversight and timely outcome-driven remote case conferencing. Learn strategies for clinical and financial success, including a primary care clinical model and well-designed quality program integrated throughout your organization. This program identifies the roadmap to prepare for value-based purchasing.

Objectives:

  • Identify an optimum clinical and case conference model that is consistent with an efficient, cost-effective primary care clinician model and includes staff to supervisor ratios, as well as responsibilities of all employees
  • Discuss the components of an optimum quality review department, responsible for all
  • OASIS and coding activities, as well as any QAPI requirements identified in the Proposed CoPs
  • Review clinician reporting that indicates successful clinical and financial outcomes or opportunities for improvement

Faculty: Carolyn Flietstra, RN, BSN, VP Home and Community Services, Holland Home, Grand Rapids, MI; Pat Laff, BS, CPA, Managing Principal, Laff Associates, Hilton Head Island, SC

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Quality

400 Series, October 29, 3:45-4:45pm Back to Top

401-How to Demonstrate the Value of Therapy Services

The practice patterns of home health will need to change when therapy utilization is not a part of the case mix system. Be prepared to demonstrate the value of home health beyond the visit count.

Objectives:

  • Review the impact of payment and policy on home health practice patterns
  • Describe effective and efficient therapy plans of care for the typical home health population
  • List the outcomes most affected by effective and efficient therapy plans of care

Faculty: Karen Vance, OTR, Managing Consultant, BKD, LLP, Springfield, MO; Diana Kornetti, BS, PT, MA, Physical Therapist, Integrity Home Health Care, Citrus Springs, FL; Cindy Krafft, PT,MS, CEO, Kornetti & Krafft Health Care Solutions, Peoria, IL

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Clinical


402-How to Prepare Your Hospice for the Revised Cost Reporting Requirements

This session describes the new hospice cost report. It will discuss the resulting need for changes in operations, data tracking, and the chart of accounts.

Objectives:

  • Explain the new data requirements and the reality of data collecting
  • Discuss the revised chart of accounts
  • Review the new cost report form

Faculty: Dawn Michelizzi, BS, Senior Vice President for Finance / CFO, The Visiting Nurse Association of Greater Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA; Tom Boyd , MBA, CFE, Vice President of Reimbursable Services, Simione Healthcare Consultants, Rohnert Park, CA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Financial


403-How to Implement and Manage the Change to Outsourced Coding

Agencies must learn to efficiently manage the changes driven by ICD-10. This program will highlight the challenges faced and answers found when making the change from in-house coding to an external solution.

Objectives:

  • Analyze the current state of coding
  • Describe the various functions impacted by outsourcing coding
  • Describe strategies for building a positive relationship with a coding vendor

Faculty: Judy Schuler, RN, MBA, Chief Clinical Officer, CHI Health at Home, Milford, OH; Jackie Dukes, BA, MFA, Vice President, Innovation and Efficiency, CHI Health at Home, Milford, OH; Kim Kindred, RN, Regional Director Clinical Services, CHI Health at Home, Milford, OH

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Technology


404-How to Assess the Financial Impact of the New Hospice Payment System

Starting in January 2016, Medicare will implement a new payment system for routine home care (RHC) under which hospices will be paid one of two daily base rates for RHC depending on where the day falls during the episode of care, as well as a service-intensity add-on (SIA) for specific services delivered during the last seven (7) days of a patient’s life.  The payment model is designed to more accurately reimbursing providers for costs incurred over a patient’s time on hospice, but its complexity is expected to reduce financial predictability in comparison with the current payment model.  This session will provide an in-depth examination of the new payment system, identify elements of the system that will diminish financial predictability, provide tools to assess the impact of the payment changes on hospice financials, and provide guidance on “next steps” for maintaining a clearer sense of a hospice’s financial status. 

Objectives:

  • Describe, in detail, the structure of the new payment system for RHC under the Medicare hospice benefit.
  • Identify elements of the payment system that reduce financial predictability.
  • Utilize tools to assist in projecting the financial impact of the payment changes.
  • Identify “next steps” that will assist hospices in monitoring financial status.

Faculty: Patrick Brown, Chief Financial Officer, Penn Home Care and Hospice Services, Bala Cynwyd, PA, and Mark P. Sharp CPA, Partner, BKD LLP, Springfield, MO

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Hospice


405-How to Develop Orientation Programs that Focus on Critical Thinking Competencies

This session will provide you with the specific steps for successful on-boarding, including the recruitment and orientation process, didactic and experiential learning modules, student input, and outcomes measured. You will leave with a detailed topical outline of an on-boarding process that supports evidence-based "critical thinking" competencies.

Objectives:

  • Identify challenges in recruiting within the current health care climate
  • List critical components of the interview process
  • Identify "critical thinking" competencies, as well as procedural competencies expected

Faculty: Merrily Evdokimoff, RN,PhD, Faculty, University of Massachusetts, Boston, MA, M & J Associates, Stow, MA; Gerri McCallig, BSN, RN, Home Care Consultant, Donnelly & Associates, Sudbury, MA; Paula McCartney, RN, BS, Education Coordinator, Hallmark Health VNA and Hospice, Inc., Malden, MA; Sylena Keeping, MSN, MBA, RN, VP of Operations/Director of Hospice, Hallmark Health VNA & Hospice, Malden, MA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/PHR); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Human Resources


406-How to Deal with Current and Future Changes: The Home Health Regulatory Roundup

This program will be presented to inform attendees about the status of the current Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) regulations and policies that are of greatest concern to home health agencies. Hot topics will include: an update on the F2F requirement, medical review activities, proposed HHCoPs, Star Rating, ICD-10 coding, and the IMPACT Act.  During this session, an opportunity will be provided to attendees to discuss the challenges that they are facing.

Objectives:

  • Identify regulations and policies under development by CMS
  • Describe the impact on home health agencies 
  • Identify methods for compliance

Faculty: Mary Carr, RN, MPH, Vice President, Regulatory Affairs, National Association for Home Care & Hospice, Washington, DC

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Legal & Regulatory


407-How to Communicate Organizational Change

Explore the theory and practice of organizational transformation and the leadership needed to make successful change. This presentation will describe the change process, needs assessment for innovation, SWOT analysis, and the short-term wins of successful organizational change.

Objectives:

  • Define the change process
  • Describe needs assessment, SWOT and culture analysis, and guiding coalition
  • Describe elements of short-term wins

Faculty: Marcylle Combs, ML, CHCE, President, Foundation Management Services, Denton, TX; Brenda Beggs, RN, BSN, CHCE, VP Regulatory Compliance, Foundation Management Services, Denton, TX

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/BMO); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Management & Leadership


408-How to Develop a Niche that Meets the Needs of a Looming Epidemic: Selling Services for Alzheimer's and Related Dementias

The increasing number of seniors in the United States, particularly the oldest old, means the number of new cases of Alzheimer’s and other dementias should double by 2050. Developing a niche program to meet the needs of this growing group can ensure agencies long-term revenue growth. Learn how to define market share potential, how to develop a niche program, and how to sell dementia services across the home care spectrum.

Objectives:

  • Describe the population with dementia, how to calculate market share numbers, and what a niche program is
  • Describe a strategy to meet the rising needs of dementia patients by developing a niche program
  • Review how to sell services for dementia care and identify potential clients

Faculty: Katherine Vanderhorst, RN, BSN, Vice-President, C&V Senior Care Specialists, Inc., Williamsville, NY; Dr. Verna Benner-Carson, PhD, PMH/CNS-BC, President, C&V Senior Care Specialists, Inc., Fallston, MD

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/MKT); 1.0 Adm. CEs (NAB/NCERS); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Marketing & Business Development


409-How to Gain More Clients: Tips for Private Duty Owners and Case Managers

Are you an owner, a care manager, or a nurse supervisor at a private duty agency? If so, learn the five-step process to get you access to care providers of potential clients and have them keep you in mind.

Objectives:

  • Define the role of owners, care managers, or nurse supervisors in gaining more clients and how much time they should allot to business development
  • Discuss the five-step process to gaining more clients through supportive Circle of Care Communication
  • Discuss best practices from the field and how to create an action plan

Faculty: Melanie Stover, OTR/L, MBA,MS/ISM, Vice President of Business Development, Home Care Sales by Power Shot Training, Inc., Shorewood, MN

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Private Duty


410-How to Cut Down on Security Risks: What You Don't Know About HIPAA Security

The security side of HIPAA is not nearly as well understood as the privacy side.  HIPAA requires providers to conduct an annual security risk assessment, but industry feedback indicates that many providers are not aware of this requirement and don’t know how to conduct a security risk assessment or act on any deficiencies it uncovers.   Also, many providers mistakenly believe that an encrypted device allows them to have unprotected Internet service.  As a result they are vulnerable to breaches and penalties. But you can cut your chance of risk if you attend this session.  We’ll cover the security risk assessment requirements and how to conduct a security risk assessment, review common noncompliant practices in home health and hospice, and provide tips for addressing deficiencies.

Objectives:

  • Explain the security risk assessment requirements
  • List the essential components of a security risk assessment
  • Review common noncompliant practices and list ways to address deficient practices

Faculty: Adam C. Solander, BS, JD, MA, Heath Industry Attorney, Epstein, Becker, Green, Washington, DC

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Quality


 

500 Series, October 29, 5:00-6:00pm Back to Top

501-How to Implement Centralized Coding: A Case Study

The year 2015 presents many challenges for home health agencies with new Face-to-Face guidelines, potential new conditions of participation, and implementation of ICD-10-CM. Outsourcing diagnosis coding is a viable option to help agencies manage day-to-day operations, reduce billing concerns and productivity implications, and stay ahead of the curve. This presentation will discuss the elements we learned as we progressed through the pilot at one location and additional lessons as more locations were included.

Objectives:

  • Identify key points for vendor evaluation
  • Describe steps of an implementation plan
  • Identify ways to prevent and overcome objections

Faculty: Elizabeth Shauen Howard, MSN, RN, COS-C, AVP of Coding and Analytics, Lawrenceburg, IN; Pamela Teenier, RN, MBA, HCS-D, COS-C, Vice President,  Integrations and Operation Support  , Gentiva, Corpus Christi, TX; Brenda Scott, DDI Certified in Facilitator Training, Implementation and Training Specialist, Gentiva, Hudson, FL

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Clinical


502-How to Successfully Avoid the Pitfalls When Growing a Business

This session will explain how to avoid possible pitfalls and show how to mitigate risks that may arise in a growing business. Companies can grow their business by building an organizational structure that can be scaled and taking an innovative sales approach that empowers all their employees to get involved in sales.

Objectives:

  • Describe pitfalls a growing agency experiences and how to avoid them
  • Identify risks in growing a business and how to mitigate them
  • Discuss tangible rewards of building a scalable corporate structure

Faculty: Amy Nelson, MBA, Founder and CEO, Accurate Home Care, Otsego, MN; Megan White, RN, BSN, PHN, Director of Nursing, Accurate Home Care, Otsego, MN

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Financial


503-How to Address Internal Barriers to Adopting Telehealth

This presentation will provide an overview of the evolution and expansion of Henry Ford's e-Home Care telehealth program. We will also discuss internal marketing of telehealth within Henry Ford's own health care system and home health agencies. Attendees will learn best practice strategies that address barriers to telehealth adoption and the migration process to a new telehealth platform

Objectives:

  • Discuss the importance of internal and external marketing for telehealth programs
  • Evaluate use and effectiveness of specialized telehealth programs
  • Evaluate adoption of a telehealth program/migration to a new platform

Faculty: Mary Hagen, RN, e-Home Care Supervisor, Henry Ford Home Health Care, Detroit, MI; Frank McMullin, RN, Sr. Account Manager, Northeast, Philips Healthcare, Framingham, MA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Technology


504-How to Bring a Medical Perspective to Hospice

In 2014, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) began returning to provider (RTP) any claims with manifestation codes as principal diagnoses and proposed new definitions for “terminal illness” and hospice “related condition.” CMS is also gathering additional data to formulate hospice payment reforms that require hospices to focus on a patient’s prognosis instead of diagnosis, clearly documenting “relatedness” and hospice eligibility. This session will explore ways hospices can develop and implement a deliberate, thoughtful process for determining a patient’s prognosis and what is related to it, as well as review required elements for documenting eligibility.

Objectives:

  • Discuss the process of establishing the principal hospice diagnosis and related conditions
  • Discuss approaches to determining whether treatments and services are related to the principal diagnosis and related conditions
  • Review hospice eligibility requirements and share tips for documenting eligibility
  • Suggest approaches hospices can take to educate medical directors and hospice physicians about how to establish prognosis and determine relatedness

Faculty:  Jennifer L. Ellis, MD, MPH, HMDC, Regional Medical Director , AL, GA, MA, MS, NC, PA, TN, VA, Aseracare Hospice, Clarkville, TN

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Hospice


505-How to Reduce Turnover, Increase Customer Satisfaction, and Grow your Business through Caregiver Certification Programs

Attendees will gain an understanding of why training and certification matters to employees, customers, and referral sources. Learn how training and certification programs can strengthen and grow your business.

Objectives:

  • Explain the need for more than basic training from both an employee and customer perspective
  • Identify concerns common to new/potential employees
  • Identify top concerns commonly shared by potential new customers and learn how to develop responsive action plans

Faculty: Sharon Brothers, MSW, Founder and CEO, Assisted Living Communities, Vancouver, Washington

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/PHR); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Human Resources


506-How to Train Staff to Be Prepared for Documentation and the New HHCoPs

Clinical documentation can jeopardize or support payment. The new HHCoPs demand changes in documentation. This session will show you how to teach and prepare your clinicians for the changed requirements in documentation.

Objectives:

  • Identify emerging trends that affect documentation standards
  • Apply the principles of the care planning process to documentation
  • Document to adhere to CoPs, including the new ones

Faculty: Mary Narayan, MSN, RN, HHCNO-BC, COS-C, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Narayan Associates, Vienna, VA; Tina Marrelli, MSN, MA, RN, FAAN, President, Marrelli and Associates, Venice , FL

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Legal & Regulatory


507-How to Brand Your Agency: Communicating your Heart and Passion

Branding is the buzzword of business, including home care. So it’s important to know how to boost your brand in order to build recognition and recalls.  Learn from a leading home care agency about the key components of branding. You’ll leave knowing what a brand is, how to impart it to your community, the importance of messaging, and how to develop systems that monitor your brand’s success.

Objectives:

  • Identify your agency's core message
  • Define the heart of your image
  • Convey your message and experience through your agency’s actions

Faculty: Bob Roth, BS, Managing Director and Co-Founder, One on One Home Care Solutions, Managing Partner, Cypress HomeCare Solutions, Phoenix, AZ

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/BMO); 1.0 Adm. CEs (NAB/NCERS); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Marketing & Business Development


509-How to Develop Dementia Specialty Programming for Private Duty Agencies

This program gives you step-by-step instructions on implementing a cutting-edge dementia program. It will show you what technology, activities, and training can help your agency stand out and offer real expertise to this fast-growing population.

Objectives:

  • Offer step-by-step instruction on how to set up a program
  • Review the roles each person in an agency plays
  • Describe the value of activities and review various options, along with the role of technology

Faculty: Gary Skole, BA, CEO, AlzBetter LLC, Cherry Hill, NJ; Andrew Dubler, BS, CEO, Home To Stay LLC, Cherry Hill , NJ

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Private Duty


510-How to Be Ready For QAPI Home Care

Proposed HHCoPs have QAPI as a condition. Quality Improvement is an important component of an agency, though many put it on the back burner, thinking that it is busy work! Despite this misconception, a Quality Improvement program can increase your quality and help you run an efficient organization with less risk. This session will discuss how to identify what you should monitor, along with how to compile, analyze, and trend. Most importantly, it will show you how to implement action plans. A great Quality Improvement program can be a simple one!

Objectives:

  • Review regulations regarding QI
  • Explain how agencies can set up a QI program
  • Describe how to have a working QI program that actually improves the agency and helps managers

Faculty: Sheryl Bellinger, MA, BSN, RN, CHCA, Administrator, Professional Home Health Care, Inc., Niwot, CO; Sharon Litwin, RN, BSHS, MHA, HCS-DL, Senior Managing Partner, 5 Star Consultants, LLC, Camdenton, MO

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Quality
 

600 Series, October 30, 9:15-10:15am Back to Top

601-How to Meet the Challenges of Chronic Disease Management in Our New Health Care Environment

Attendees will be presented with a model of patient care that contrasts with traditional models by focusing on factors that patients can affect as they self-manage their chronic conditions. This partnership model draws on common behavior change theories to motivate patients. Health coaching interventions, specifically motivational interviewing, have been shown to improve patient outcomes and lead to better coordinated care.

Objectives:

  • Discuss the partnership model of patient care and compare it with the traditional model of patient care
  • Describe five themes present across commonly used behavior change theories and recognize their relevance to an evidence-based health coaching approach
  • Discuss motivational interviewing as a health care intervention

Faculty: Renee Coughlin, PT, DPT, MHS, COS-C, CCP, Director, Rehabilitation Services, Cleveland Clinic Home Care Services, Independence, OH; Cindy Vunovich, RN, BSN, MSM, Administrator, Home Health and Hospice, Cleveland Clinic Home Care Services, Independence, OH

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Clinical


602-How to Improve Outcomes While Dealing with Reimbursement Cuts

With the third year of PPS cost rebasing around the corner, it remains very important for agencies to monitor costs while improving clinical outcomes. So agencies will have to make their operations more efficient to preserve margins. Meanwhile, on the clinical front, reporting measures call for agencies to focus heavily on reducing ACH rates. Effective episode management that uses best practice processes and triggers will be the key to success in both these areas.

Objectives:

  • Identify changes under the PPS rebasing model and their impact on home health agency operations and financial outcomes
  • Describe the components and phases of effective episode management
  • List results from using best practice nursing and therapy operational processes and care triggers needed to improve outcomes and enhance patient experience

Faculty: Laurie Salmons, RN, BSN, Clinical Consulting Manager, McBee Associates, Knoxville, TN; Michael Dordick, MBA, Senior Vice President, McBee Associates, Inc., Wayne, PA; Brenda Czado, RN, BSN, MBA, Director of Nursing, Androscoggin Home Health, Lewiston, ME

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Financial


603-How to Use Telehealth to Improve Outcomes: Banner Health’s Experience with Patients in its Pioneer ACO

This session describes a Banner Care program that focuses on patients who have the highest recurring costs and receive ongoing care from a co-located, cross-functional telehealth team. The clinical, operational, and financial dimensions of the program will be discussed.

Objectives:

  • Describe and identify economic incentives and outcomes for the program and selection criteria for including patients.
  • Illustrate the clinical care models used at Banner Care
  • Discuss the role of technology improving outcomes and clinical efficiency

Faculty: Julie Reisetter, MS, RN, Chief Nursing Officer-Telehealth Services, Banner Health, Phoenix, AZ

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); Approved for 1.0; 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Technology


604-How to Create a “Dementia Capable” Hospice Team: Raising the Bar

People with advanced dementia commonly undergo aggressive and burdensome interventions that offer little to no clinical benefit. Hospices can bridge the gap between the type of care Americans with dementia want at life’s end and what they commonly receive. The traditional hospice model does not, however, meet the unique care needs of both dementia patients and their loved ones. In 2003, Hospice of the Valley (HOV) responded to this pressing need by creating a dementia program that educates all members of the hospice interdisciplinary teams in best practices for advanced dementia and provides them with innovative discipline-specific materials. Since its inception, the dementia program has led to positive outcomes while serving thousand of persons with dementia and their loved ones. Customers and staff are more satisfied, and there have been fewer preventable hospitalizations, along with simpler medication regimens and a higher percentage of completed health care directives. This session will provide insights into the challenges of and methods for tailoring hospice care to effectively meet the special needs of individuals with advanced dementia and their families.

Objectives:

  • Identify the disease-specific needs of individuals and families dealing with advanced dementia
  • Outline the roles and responsibilities of members of the interdisciplinary team in addressing dementia care needs
  • Delineate the methods for ensuring proper education and clinical practice to meet the care needs of patients with advanced dementia

Faculty: Maribeth Gallagher, DNP, FAAN, Dementia Program Director, Hospice of the Valley, Scottsdale, AZ

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/); Approved for 1.0; 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Hospice


606-How to Mitigate Risk; Enforcement Trends in Home Health and Hospice

This program will discuss current federal and state enforcement trends in both the home health and hospice sectors. Understanding the focus of government enforcers helps providers know how to prioritize activities in their compliance programs in order to audit and monitor areas of high risk. The program will also explore compliance and risk mitigation steps that home health and hospice providers can take now to address these enforcement trends.

Objectives:

  • Explain government enforcement trends in home health and hospice
  • Identify recent regulatory responses to areas of risk in home health and hospice
  • Explore risk-mitigation actions that home health and hospice providers can take to address government enforcement activities

Faculty: Emily Bajcsi, Esq., Attorney, Epstein Becker Green, PC, Boston, MA; Serra Schlanger,Esq., Associate Attorney, Epstein Becker Green, PC, Washington, DC; Jason Christ, Esq., Attorney, Epstein Becker & Green, PC, Washington, DC

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE); 1.0 Adm. CEs (NAB/NCERS); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Legal & Regulatory


607-How to Prepare for the Future of Complex Care Management

Health care delivery in the United States is changing at a rapid pace. Most providers realize the fee-for-service system will likely be completely replaced by a value-driven system in the near future. In keeping with this knowledge, health systems are experimenting with various models of care to find a model that will successfully address patient outcomes, patient satisfaction, and overall cost of care. Many of these models highlight the value of post-acute care services. This session discusses the driving forces for change and depicts some of the emerging models of care, including a model developed in a mid-sized health care system in Illinois. The model presented is one that emphasizes communication and collaboration across providers on transitional care, longitudinal care planning, home care and home-based services, as well as full use of the continuum of care. The model focuses on complex and/or chronically ill patients at high risk for readmission, undesired outcomes, and increased costs.

Objectives:

  • Discuss driving forces for change in America’s health care delivery system
  • Describe various models for providing intensive-care management to high-risk patients
  • Describe the features of the complex care model presented in this session

Faculty: Mary Newberry, RN MSN, Director, Riverside Health Care, Kankakee, IL; Beth Ludwig, MSN RN CCP CHFN, Kankakee, IL; Deborah Bradley, RN, MSN, Home Care Manager, Riverside Home Health Care, Peotone, IL

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/BMO); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Management & Leadership


608-How to Develop New Models of Care for Medicaid Patients

In many states Medicaid programs are rapidly shifting to managed care, integrated and performance-based care models. As home care providers struggle to provide quality services and support to Medicaid beneficiaries, care must be both clinically and economically appropriate. Home care agencies must adapt to work outside of traditional fee for service models to develop technology-empowered and outcome-based programs that share risk and rewards with MCOs. New options for home care agencies to work with State Medicaid Programs that are innovative, maintain patients safely in their communities and provide financial incentives for quality outcomes will be discussed.

Objectives:

  • Identify integrative and efficient methods for survival
  • Identify innovative care models that will sustain your organization through the transformation of healthcare
  • Identify survival-based strategies to effectively and efficiently operate within the rapidly emerging paradigm of value and risk based healthcare

Faculty: Laurie Neander, RN, MS, CEO, Bassett Healthcare Network At Home Care, Inc., Oneonta, NY; Ellen Bolch, MSN, BSN, MHA, President, THA Group, Savannah, GA; Andrea Devoti, MSN, MBA, CHCE, President & CEO, Neighborhood Health Agencies, West Chester, PA; Colin Roskey, Esq., Executive Director of the Medicaid Action Council and Counsel to NAHC, Alston & Bird, LLP,Washington, DC

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track:Legal & Regulatory


609-How to Stay Informed: The Private Duty Home Care Association (PDHCA) Open Forum

Meet and talk with the PDHCA Advisory Board members at an open forum as we discuss exciting news on industry trends, the new NAHC Accreditation Process, the private duty community, and the current political climate, including the status of the federal companionship exemption and health care reform. Please come to listen and interact. We want to hear from you!

Objectives:

  • Share information
  • Join in open discussion with PDHCA Advisory Board members
  • Trade views with colleagues

Faculty: Brittnei Salerno, BS, Owner/CEO, La Jolla Nurses Homecare, La Jolla, CA; Lucy Andrews, RN, MS, CEO , At Your Home Services, Santa Rosa, CA; Pat Drea, BSN, MPA, Chief Operating Officer, Visiting Angels, Charlotte, NC

Course Level: No CEs or CPEs awarded for this session

Track: Private Duty


610-How to Understand and Utilize HHQI's Cardiovascular QAPI Plan

Come and learn innovative ways to incorporate the Home Health Quality Improvement (HHQI) National Campaign's free cardiovascular health improvement resources into your agency’s practice. Develop your agency's individualized cardiovascular health QAPI plan using HHQI's tools and resources.

Objectives:

  • Describe the purpose of HHQI's cardiovascular health initiative
  • Develop a cardiovascular QAPI plan using key tools from the Cardiovascular Health Best Practice Intervention Packages (BPIPs)
  • Evaluate the cardiovascular QAPI plan using the Home Health Cardiovascular Data Registry.

Faculty: Misty Kevech, RN, BS Ed, MS, RN Project Coordinator, Quality Insights, Charleston, WV; Cindy Sun, MSN, RN, COS-C, CCP, Lead Cardiovascular Project Coordinator, Quality Insights, Charleston, WV; Crystal Welsh, BSN, MSN, RN, RN Project Coordinator,WVMI & Quality Insights, Charleston, WV

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Quality

700 Series, October 30, 2:30-3:30pm Back to Top

701-How to Determine if Your Recert LUPA Patient is High Risk

Highly vulnerable patients are too often hidden from sight, leaving them at risk of rapid disease progression, injury, and death. Raising awareness of their plight, defining their characteristics, and responding with community-based care protocols advances the quality of care they receive through patient-centered, population health management.

Objectives:

  • Describe how identification of vulnerable patients affects population health and use clear clinical indicators to identify vulnerable patients
  • Identify agency processes for identifying vulnerable patients and discuss associated clinical protocols for community-based care management
  • Evaluate outcomes, including the impact on Triple Aim objectives, of better care for vulnerable patients

Faculty: Karen Gomes, RN, MS, CPHQ, Chief Clinical Officer, Vice President, Home Health Foundation, Lawrence, MA; Helen DiLena, RN BS, Director Clinical Services, Home Health Foundation/ VNA, Lawrence, MA; Cynthia Campbell, RN, BSN, Associate Director Operational Consulting, Fazzi Associates, Inc., Northampton, MA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Clinical


702-How to Be Ready for Mergers and Acquisitions

What you now know about home health and hospice M&A may not be true any more. The valuation metrics have changed. The buyers are very different, and they're pursuing different strategies. It's decidedly not the same old, same old M&A market. In this session, we will explore how and why the market has changed, and what it might mean to you if you are a potential buyer, seller, or intend to sit it out.

Objectives:

  • Identify the key environmental changes that have impacted M&A strategies
  • Describe how changes in the environment impact M&A strategies
  • Discuss the outlook for M&A in the near future

Faculty: Dexter Braff, MBA, MS, BA, President, The Braff Group, Pittsburgh, PA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/MKT); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Financial


703-How to Unlock a Customer-Driven Growth Strategy for Your Private Duty Home Care Business

Client referrals are the #1 generator of revenue for private duty agencies. That’s the word from the 2015 Private Duty Benchmarking Study conducted by Home Care Pulse. Founder and CEO of Home Care Pulse, will bring home the point by exploring strategies to help you unlock the power of referrals for your home care business. Attendees will leave with a deeper understanding of how to develop a customer-driven growth strategy and why it is the best way to ramp up their home care business.

Objectives:

  • Gain greater insight into how a customer-driven growth strategy can drive revenue
  • Describe how to unlock the power of client referrals for a home care business
  • Identify promoters and build a referral campaign

Faculty: Aaron Marcum, BS, Founder and CEO, Home Care Pulse, Rexburg, ID

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV) 

Track: Private Duty


704-How to Deal with Current and Future Changes: Hospice Policy Roundup Part 1

The Medicare Hospice Benefit has entered an era of rapid change driven by regulatory and legislative initiatives. As part of this session, experts from NAHC’s affiliate, the Hospice Association of America, will provide insight into the latest regulatory issues hospice providers are addressing, as well as changes that are anticipated in the not-too-distant future. The session will also outline hospice issues currently under consideration by Congress, the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC), and oversight organizations which may yield future changes in Medicare hospice policy.

Objectives:

  • Outline key issues related to current and future hospice regulatory requirements
  • Describe federal legislative initiatives in hospice and end-of-life care
  • Describe work related to hospice that is currently being conducted by MedPAC

Faculty: Theresa M. Forster, Vice President for Hospice Policy & Programs; and Katie Wehri, CHC, CHPC, Hospice Regulatory and Operations Specialist; both of the National Association for Home Care & Hospice, Washington, DC

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Hospice


705-How to Effectively Deal With Conflict Management:

This course examines the role that team building and management, along with conflict management, play in leadership. Particular attention will be given to various approaches to conflict management and practical skill development in negotiating, forging a shared vision, team role assignment, and effective small-group and individual communication in both routine and crisis situations.

Objectives:

  • Articulate the five different processes/strategies used in assessing and managing conflict
  • Identify conflict management skills in personal and professional contexts
  • Identify common obstacles to conflict resolution and successful techniques for overcoming them

Faculty: Marcylle Combs, ML, CHCE, President, Foundation Management Services, Denton, TX; Samantha McKay, ML, CHCE, Regional Director of Customer Loyalty, Foundation Management Services, Denton, TX

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/PHR); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Human Resources


706-How to Stay Informed: A Panel Update on Medicaid

Medicaid is fast becoming the center of home care services for all age groups. At the same time, Medicaid home care is rapidly changing with innovations in home- and community-based care programs. NAHC’s Medicaid Action Council will offer information and opportunities to discuss the hottest Medicaid issues of the day.

Objectives:

  • Identify the priority issues and trends affecting Medicaid home care
  • Describe the activities of the NAHC Medicaid Action Council
  • Recognize the growing opportunities in Medicaid home care

Faculty: Colin Roskey, Esq., Alston & Bird; Ellen Bolch, President and CEO, THA Group; Andrea Devoti, MSN, MBA, RN, President, Neighborhood Health, West Chester, PA

Course Level: Intermediate: 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0CPEs (NASBA/RE); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Legal & Regulatory


707-How to Provide Home Care for Patients in Retirement Communities

Caring for patients in retirement communities involves developing a plan for managing the patients’ unique needs. It also depends on developing the unique provider partnerships associated with retirement communities.

Objectives:

  • Discuss opportunities in retirement communities
  • Describe one agency’s experience working with retirement communities
  • Demonstrate how to use data to manage partnerships with retirement communities

Faculty: Sue Blockberger-Miller, RN, MSN, Senior Vice President of Operations, Home Care Partners of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH; Christine Lang, MBA, Senior Director, Product Strategy, National Research Corporation, Menomonee Falls, WI

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/BMO); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Management & Leadership


708-How to Create Winning Partnerships with ACOs

We will explore real-world examples of how collaborating with an ACO can lead to better patient care—and to a better bottom line. This session will address the current state of accountable care, perspectives from ACO leadership, and the future of ACOs and home health care. Attendees will leave with an understanding of how to create a powerful value proposition that leads to enduring partnerships with ACOs.

Objectives:

  • Describe the current state of accountable care, including ACO quality and financial performance, bundled payments, new ACO types, and where the ACO model is headed
  • Discuss the latest perspectives of ACO executives based on data from Darwin’s 2015 ACO Executive Panel. Learn their views on home health care, which disease states they prioritize, ways they control costs, and how they are improving population health

     

  • Demonstrate how to target, approach, and create a winning value proposition for ACOs

     

Faculty: Bob Roth, BS, Principal and Consultant, OneSource HomeCare Consultants, Managing Partner, Cypress HomeCare Solutions, Phoenix, AZ; John Marchica, BA, MA, MBA, President, Darwin Research Group, Phoenix, AZ

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/MKT); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Marketing & Business Development


709-How to Use Technology in Your Agency Now and in the Future

This interactive session will discuss the current technology available to home care agencies and how they can use it to be more efficient and productive. We will look at both external and internal pressures related to agencies’ use of technology and explore the future of integrated technology solutions.

Objectives:

  • Describe two barriers to agencies’ use of technology
  • List at least two technology changes they can make to enhance their operations
  • List at least two future technologies they might use to improve client care

Faculty: Lucy Andrews, RN, MS, CEO, At Your Home Services, Santa Rosa, CA; Brittnei Salerno, BS, Owner/CEO, La Jolla Nurses Homecare, La Jolla, CA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Private Duty


710-How to Improve Outcomes Related to Influenza and Pneumococcal Immunization

Please join a national expert and a panel of HHQI representatives to see how your current influenza and pneumococcal immunizationpractices compare to national guidelines. HHQI will showcase free evidence-based resources to make a positive impact on the care you are delivering now.

Objectives:

  • Describe influenza and pneumococcal preventative care in the home and community
  • Compare specific tools and resources for home health or community clinicians
  • Evaluate an agency’s immunization process using HHQI Immunization Reports

Faculty: Cindy Sun, MSN, RN, COS-C, HHQI Lead Cardiovascular Project Coordinator, WVMI / Quality Insights, Charleston, WV; Mary McGoldrick, MS, RN, CRNI, Infection Preventionist and Consultant for HH, Home Health Systems, Inc., St. Simons Island, GA; Misty Kevech, RN, BS Ed, MS, COS-C, CCP, RN Project Coordinator, WVMI / Quality Insights, Charleston, WV 25304, WV

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Quality
 

800 Series, October 30, 3:45pm-4:45pm Back to Top

801-How to Use Scope of Practice as a Guide for Nursing Practice Evaluation

This session will help agencies and their nurses achieve excellent home health nursing practice by using the American Nurses Association's Scope & Standards of Practice as a guide for practice and performance evaluation.

Objectives:

  • Describe the purpose and evolution of ANA's Home Health Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice
  • Discuss issues facing home health nursing practice and the professional, legal and ethical implications of the Scope and Standards
  • Use the standards to elevate the practice of your agency’s nurses

Faculty: Mary Narayan, MSN, RN, HHCNO-BC, COS-C, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Narayan Associates, Vienna, VA; Marilyn Harris, BSN, MSN, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN, Emeritus, Retired, Warminister, PA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Clinical


802-How to Manage Compliance in the Revenue Cycle

This workshop will leverage the expertise of the HHFMA committee devoted to billing operations and cash flow. It comes at a time of increased regulation as both Medicare and Medicaid give closer scrutiny to home health and hospice documentation and billing practices. Join this forum to share knowledge and experiences on effectively managing regulatory compliance throughout the revenue cycle.

Objectives:

  • Discuss various program integrity contractors focused on home care and hospice providers
  • Describe current program integrity activity aimed at home health and hospice providers
  • Articulate effective ways to manage key compliance risks

Faculty: Melinda Gaboury, BBA, CEO, Healthcare Provider Solutions, Inc., Nashville, TN; M. Aaron Little, CPA, Managing Director, BKD, LLC, Springfield, MO

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Financial


803-How to Develop the Expertise to Put Your Agency-Specific Training Online

Have ever thought that your agency’s training and education was superior to an on-line vendor's? Have you also considered how much more efficient it would be to record the programs your agency provides and keep them for future use? This session will provide an overview of Moodle (open source software) to put your agency-specific training on-line. We will review specifications, considerations, and the expertise needed to make this happen.

Objectives:

  • Review training and competency requirements for home care and hospice.
  • Describe Moodle
  • List Moodle system requirements

Faculty: Juli Wallace, BS, MT (ASCP), Chief Operating Officer, LifeSpring In-Home Care Network, LLC, Norman, OK; Karen Vahlberg, RN, BSN, Chief Executive Officer, LifeSpring In-Home Care Network, Norman, OK

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Technology


804-How to Deal with Current and Future Changes: Hospice Policy Roundup Part 2

The Medicare Hospice Benefit has entered an era of rapid change driven by regulatory and legislative initiatives. As part of this session, experts from NAHC’s affiliate, the Hospice Association of America, will provide insight into the latest regulatory issues hospice providers are addressing, as well as changes that are anticipated in the not-too-distant future. The session will also outline hospice issues currently under consideration by Congress, the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC), and oversight organizations which may yield future changes in Medicare hospice policy.

Objectives:

  • Outline key issues related to current and future hospice regulatory requirements
  • Describe federal legislative initiatives in hospice and end-of-life care
  • Describe work related to hospice that is currently being conducted by MedPAC

Faculty: Theresa M. Forster, Vice President for Hospice Policy & Programs; and Katie Wehri, CHC, CHPC, Hospice Regulatory and Operations Specialist, both of the National Association for Home Care & Hospice, Washington, DC

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Hospice


805-How to Prepare New Clinical Staff for the Challenges of Home Care in 2015

The home care environment continues to become more challenging and complex as an increasing amount of advanced care is being delivered in the home setting. Providing new clinical staff with a firm foundation is critical to their success in managing the care and education of the home care population, and keeping that population safely at home and out of the hospital. This is one organization’s experience in developing a comprehensive sequential orientation program.

Objectives:

  • Explain the benefits of developing a consistent format for the orientation of new clinical staff
  • Describe the importance of fostering a staff/agency partnership from day one.
  • Show how commitment to the comprehensive orientation process will help develop and retain staff.

Faculty: Natalie Kenney, RN, Transition care Nurse & Special Projects Manager, MetroWest HomeCare & Hospice, Marlborough, MA; Susan DeCollibus MA. PT, COS-C, HCS-C, MA, PT, COS-C, HCS-C, Clinical Education and Documentation Manager, MetroWest HomeCare & Hospice, Marlborough, MA; Tracy Schultz RN BSN WCC CMRSN, RN, BSN, WCC, CMRSN, Nurse Educator , Vanguard Home Care/ McNeal Home Care, Berwyn, IL

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/PHR); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Human Resources


806-How to Assimilate the Tools and Best Practices Derived from the Integrated Care Management Model to Meet the New HHCoPs

Home health agencies can position themselves to meet the proposed CMS Conditions of Participation (CoPs) by equipping staff with tools and competencies to deliver patient-centered, health-literate care. Presenters will review best practices that meet the intent of the new CoPs.

Objectives:

  • Develop a continuous, integrated care process across all home health services, based on patient-centered assessment, care planning, service delivery, quality assessment and performance improvement
  • Explain how to use a patient-centered, interdisciplinary approach that recognizes the contributions of various skilled professionals and their mutual interactions to meet patients’ needs
  • Demonstrate how to stress quality improvements by incorporating an outcome-oriented, data-driven quality assessment and performance improvement program

Faculty: Beth Hennessey, RN, BSN, MSN, Executive Director, Sutter Center for Integrated Care, Sutter Care at Home, Fairfield, CA; Paula Suter, BSN, MA, Clinical Director, Sutter Center for Integrated Care, Sutter Care at Home, Roseville, CA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Legal & Regulatory


807-How to Become a High Performing Leader

Your leadership skills may be the most important thing you bring to your employees and organization, so let’s take time to put effort into getting better! In the intense pressures of our days, it is often hard to look inward and see how our actions are affecting our organization. Outcomes need to be met and it takes effort to align all employees to these outcomes. Come away from this session with concrete tactics to improve your leadership skills and feel energized again. The best part of your job can be helping your employees develop in their roles and perform at an exceptional level!

Objectives:

  • Identify your leadership style
  • Apply creative strategies to engage staff
  • Prioritize leadership skills as a critical element of your role

Faculty: Lois Bentler-Lampe, MS, RN-BC, Chief Nursing Officer, VP Clinical Operations, OSF Home Care Services, Peoria , IL

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/BMO); 1.0 Adm. CEs (NAB/NCERS); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Management & Leadership


808- How to Improve the Customer Experience: The Keys to Improving Quality and Patient Safety

Learn the key factors leading to a superior customer experience. Then leverage this high level of customer satisfaction to improve quality of care and patient safety.

Objectives:

  • Identify three key components of an exceptional customer experience
  • Describe the link between a superior customer experience, quality of care, and patient safety
  • Name three key tools used to improve customer experience

Faculty: Julia Finken, RN, BSN, CPHQ, CSSBB, Associate Director, The Joint Commission, Oakbrook Terrace, IL

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/BMO); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Marketing & Business Development


809-How to Grow Your Sales in Private Duty

Learn how Cheryl Peltekis, RN, owner of a home health and hospice organization launched a sales team to save her organization! After years of hard work she finally got to a place where she could hire staff and not work every weekend. But in 2009, Cheryl's company had suffered three years of losses and she had to act fast to save her company! This is her journey of success! This mom of five knows how to run a team, and she created a culture of growth that increased her company's revenues by two million dollars!

Objectives:

  • Review common mistakes that agencies make in organizing their sales efforts
  • Describe a plan for establishing accountability and a viable business plan
  • Lead staff in understanding that sales is a component of everyone’s job

Faculty: Cheryl Peltekis, RN, Vice President and Clinical Director, Immediate Home Care and Hospice, Bensalem, PA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Private Duty


810-How to Use Shared Governance for Quality/Process Improvement

Attendees will learn how a home care and hospice agency uses a shared governance approach in quality/process improvement to enhance process development/revision and create a culture that supports quality.

Objectives:

  • Define the purpose/benefits of a shared governance approach to quality and performance improvement
  • Identify key departments/staff in an agency to be represented in shared governance
  • Create an appropriate format/agenda for shared governance meeting

Faculty: Cathy Hupf, RN, BSN, Director of Quality/Performance Improvement, Methodist Alliance Home Care, Hospice, and HME, Memphis, TN

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Quality

900 Series, October 30, 5:00-6:00pm Back to Top

901-How to Structure and Standardize Nurse-led Transitional Home Visits Using Qualitative Input from Key Stakeholders

In 2013, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital introduced a nurse-led transitional home visit (THV) program. The program was designed to provide a THV to patients 24 to 72 hours after an acute-care hospitalization. The content of these visits was initially based on patients’ hospital discharge instructions, which varied by provider. Using stakeholder feedback, we sought to structure and standardize the THVs to ensure they were patient and family centered.

Objectives:

  • Describe how qualitative feedback from key stakeholders can serve to standardize interventions aimed at facilitating transitions from hospital to home
  • Explain how the use of disease-specific templates and red-flag warning signs affected hospital-to-home transitions for pediatric patients after acute-care admissions
  • Describe how a home care entity successfully partnered with a hospital system to improve patient outcomes 

Faculty:  Jennifer Gold, RN, BSN, Clincial Director, Cincinnati Children's Home Care Services, Cincinnati, OH; Susan Wade Murphy, MSN, RN, Assistant Vice President Care Management, Division of Patient Services, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH

Course Level:  Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Clinical


902-How to Stay Informed: Financial Managers Open Forum

Once again, the Home Care &Hospice Financial Managers Association (HHFMA) presents its no holds-barred, open forum meeting to pull together all the crucial information presented in the financial management workshops, including legislative and regulatory developments, along with innovations in health care. This session will address any and all issues of interest to conference faculty and attendees. The insights are endless, the advice is free, and the experience is priceless. All are welcome to attend and get engaged!

Faculty: William Dombi, Esq., VP for Law, Executive Director, HHFMA, Director, Center for Health Care Law, National Association for Home Care & Hospice, Washington, DC

Course Level: No CEs or CPEs awarded for this session

Track: Financial


903-How to Re-Charge Your Telehealth and Remote Patient Monitoring System

Aurora at Home shares techniques to develop or recharge your remote patient monitoring program. This session will cover episode management and patient engagement within our telehealth program.

Objectives:

  • Discuss remote patient monitoring strategies implemented by Aurora at Home
  • Explain program scope and roles of a patient’s health care team
  • Demonstrate outcomes of Aurora’s remote monitoring program

Faculty: Melissa Jordan, RN, BSN, Director Quality, Aurora Health Care, Milwaukee, WI; Amy Shockley, MSN, G-CNS, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Aurora Health Care, Milwaukee, WI

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Technology


904-How to Ensure a Culture of Compliance in your Hospice

Regardless of requirements, it is becoming ever more important to have an effective compliance program, which is not a packet of a few policies that staff members learn each year. An effective compliance program encompasses the seven elements laid out by CMS and implements them in a culture of compliance. This session will explain the components of an effective compliance program, the importance of such a program, and tips for creating and maintaining a culture of compliance. It will also outline what to do when a compliance issue is discovered.

Objectives:

  • Explain the hallmarks of an effective compliance program and the importance of such a program
  • Discuss how hospices can create a culture of compliance.
  • Explain what to do when a hospice identifies a gap in compliance

Faculty:  Bill Musick, BS, MBA, CHC, Consultant Projects Manager Senior Associate,The Corridor Group, Overland Park KS

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Hospice


905-How to Develop Systems to Improve Clinician Competence

People, processes, and technology are the resources that work together to drive health care organizations in today’s world. This presentation will explore how to create an environment to move your business ahead and ensure clinical competence while delivering quality patient care.

Objectives:

  • Discuss the importance of ensuring competence of field staff
  • Name three challenges facing home care clinicians in identifying how to navigate the continuum of care for their patients
  • Analyze how improvements in technology, processes, and tools could impact the speed with which clinicians become competent in the field

Faculty: Judy Schuler, MBA, RN, Chief Clinical Officer, CHI Health at Home (formally CHS/CHI National Home, Milford, OH; Louis Pilla, MBA, RN, Director of Product Strategy, Elsevier, Philadelphia, PA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/PHR); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Human Resources


907-How to Age in Place: Quality of Life through the Full Continuum: The Impact of Interior Design

The implementation of health care reform and increase in community-based services are redesigning how we receive care. Maintaining the continuum of care now requires a focus on all living settings to enhance independence, longevity, and wellness until the end of life. This is the goal of the 2014 Residential Guidelines for Design and Construction of Residential Health, Care, and Support Facilities. The current emphasis on person-centered care looks to maximize positive outcomes for older adults —whether in a single- family home, townhouse or apartment, continuing care retirement community, assisted living, nursing, or hospice setting.   This presentation will highlight information on following the guidelines, creating supportive environments, and using an interior designer as part of the care team. 

Objectives:

  • Explain how interior design can affect the process of aging in place
  • Determine when a caregiver may need the services of an interior designer
  • Discuss the public policy implications of design that promotes community-based care

Faculty: Jim Brewer, BA, VP of Government & Public Affairs, American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), Washington, DC; Jane M. Rohde, AIA, FIIDA, ASID, ACHA, CHID, LEED, AP, BD+C, GG-CIEB Assessor, JSR Associates, Inc., Principal, Ellicott City, MD

Course Level:  Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/MKT)1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Marketing & Business Development


908-How to Operate a Competitive Private Duty Program in Your Home Care Agency

Home health agencies that have provided only traditional home health and may even be hospital based will learn how to develop a successful business model for opening and operating a private duty program that can compete with anyone in their market. The presenters have successfully accomplished this in a hospital home health department, a SNF-based agency, and a large, independent, not-for-profit home health agency.

Objectives:

  • Grasp the nuances of private duty programs
  • Know how to develop a private duty program within a home health agency
  • Explain how to succeed in providing private duty

Faculty: Mary Haynor, BSN, MBA, President & CEO, Horizon Home Care & Hospice, Milwaukee, WI; Coleen Schmidt, BA, RN, BSN, Chief Operating Officer, Horizon Home Care & Hospice, Milwaukee, WI

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/MKT); 1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV)

Track: Private Duty


909-How to Make the Transition to ICD-10 without Hurting Your Bottom Line

It’s official. ICD-10 is now the required coding system for use by all HIPAA-covered entities. If your agency submits claims to Medicare, you’re probably now beginning to realize that the switch from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM was more than just a code change. Every aspect of your operations has been affected. Maybe you’re seeing a significant drop in productivity among coders and clinicians. Perhaps you’re contending with delayed claims due to improper code selection, glitches in your software, or miscommunications between you, the provider, and your payer. Whatever the problem, this session will show you what you need to do now to minimize the impact of ICD-10 on your bottom line. Learn to bring productivity back to the levels you had before the advent of ICD-10.

Objectives:

  • Benchmark your agency’s ICD-10 transition against industry norms
  • Identify causes of declining productivity and learn what steps you can take to recover
  • Describe how gaps in your staff’s skills can affect revenue and how to address individual and systemic needs for training

Faculty: Tricia A. Twombly, RN, BSN, HCS-D, HCS-O, COS-C, CHCE, AHIMA Approved ICD-10 Trainer, Senior Director, CEO, (BMSC), the credentialing body of the Association of Home Care Coding & Compliance (AHCC); Corinne Kuypers-Denlinger, BS, VP, Post-Acute Care Product Group, Executive Director, AHCC, both from DecisionHealth, Gaithersburg, MD

Course Level:  Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA);  1.0  Social Workers CEs (NASW, except NY, MI, WV) 

Track: Quality


910-How to Create Home Health Value in Pursuit of the Triple Aim

This is not the time to rest on past laurels. Your agency’s value is defined by current outcomes: lower cost, better quality, and impact on population health. So redesign your structure, workflow, and clinical model to increase your value in today’s market.

Objectives:

  • Describe a home health Triple Aim readiness assessment for evaluating and improving an agency’s structure, function, and value in managing population health
  • Identify elements of personal and collaborative leadership growth within agencies and the health system as they pursue the Triple Aim of health care
  • Identify outcomes achieved through Triple Aim Readiness and the impact of working toward a united goal: the Triple Aim of health care.

Faculty: Cindyleigh Mocilnikar, RN, Director Home Health, Lake Health, Concord Twp, OH; Janie Racer, MBA, BS, RRT, Vice President Clinical Services, Lake Health, Concord Township, OH; Cynthia Campbell, RN, BSN, Associate Director Operational Consulting, Fazzi Associates, Inc., Northampton, MA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.0 nursing CEs; 1.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); 1.0 Adm. CEs (NAB/NCERS)

Track: Quality

 

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