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Testimonials

In the various roles he has undertaken through the years, Val J. Halamandaris has been a singular driving force behind the policy and program initiatives resulting in the recognition of home health care as a viable alternative to institutionalization. His dedication to consumer advocacy, which enhances the quality of life and dignity of those receiving home health care, merits VNA HealthCare Group’s highest recognition and deepest respect. 

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VNA HealthCare Group

I have the highest respect for them, especially for the nurses, aides and therapists, who devote their lives to caring for people with disabilities, the infirm and dying Americans.  There are few more noble professions.

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President Barack Obama

Home health care agencies do such a wonderful job in this country helping people to be able to remain at home and allowing them to receive services

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U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) Chair, Democratic Steering and Outreach Committee

Home care is a combination of compassion and efficiency.  It is less expensive than institutional care...but at the same time it is a more caring, human, intimate experience, and therefore it has a greater human element...it’s a big mistake not to try to maximize it and find ways to give people the home care option over either nursing homes, hospitals or other institutions

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Former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Newt Gingrich (R-GA)

Medicaid covers long-term care, but only for low-income families.  And Medicare only pays for care that is connected to a hospital discharge....our health care system must cover these vital services...[and] we should promote home-based care, which most people prefer, instead of the institutional care that we emphasize now.

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Former U.S. Senator Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-CD)

We need incentives to...keep people in home health care settings...It’s dramatically less expensive than long term care.

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U.S. Senator John McCain (R-AZ)

 

Home care is clearly the wave of the future. It’s clearly where patients want to be cared for. I come from an ethnic family and when a member of our family is severely ill, we would never consider taking them to get institutional care. That’s true of many families for both cultural and financial reasons. If patients have a choice of where they want to be cared for, where it’s done the right way, they choose home.

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Donna Shalala, former Secretary of Health and Human Services

A couple of years ago, I spent a little bit of time with the National Association for Home Care & Hospice and its president, Val J. Halamandaris, and I was just blown away. What impressed me so much was that they talked about what they do as opposed to just the strategies of how to deal with Washington or Sacramento or Albany or whatever the case may be. Val is a fanatic about care, and it comes through in every way known to mankind. It comes through in the speakers he invites to their events; it comes through in all the stuff he shares.

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Tom Peters, author of In Search of Excellence

Val’s home care organization brings thousands of caregivers together into a dynamic organization that provides them with valuable resources and tools to be even better in their important work. He helps them build self-esteem, which leads to self-motivation.

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Mike Vance, former Dean of Disney and author of Think Out of the Box

Val is one of the greatest advocates for seniors in America. He goes beyond the call of duty every time.

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Arthur S. Flemming, former Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare

Val has brought the problems, the challenges, and the opportunities out in the open for everyone to look at. He is a visionary pointing the direction for us. 

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Margaret (Peg) Cushman, Professor of Nursing and former President of the Visiting Nurses Association

Although Val has chosen to stay in the background, he deserves much of the credit for what was accomplished both at the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging, where he was closely associated with me and at the House Select Committee on Aging, where he was Congressman Claude Pepper’s senior counsel and closest advisor. He put together more hearings on the subject of aging, wrote more reports, drafted more bills, and had more influence on the direction of events than anyone before him or since.

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Frank E. Moss, former U.S. Senator

Val’s most important contribution is pulling together all elements of home health care and being able to organize and energize the people involved in the industry.

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Frank E. Moss, former U.S. Senator

Anyone working on health care issues in Congress knows the name Val J. Halamandaris.

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Kathleen Gardner Cravedi, former Staff Director of the House Select Committee on Aging

Without your untiring support and active participation, the voices of people advocating meaningful and compassionate health care reform may not have been heard by national leaders.

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Michael Sullivan, Former Executive Director, Indiana Association for Home Care

All of us have been members of many organizations and NAHC is simply the best there is. NAHC aspires to excellence in every respect; its staff has been repeatedly honored as the best in Washington; the organization lives by the highest values and has demonstrated a passionate interest in the well-being of patients and providers.

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Elaine Stephens, Director of Home Care of Steward Home Care/Steward Health Systems and former NAHC C

Home care increasingly is one of the basic building blocks in the developing system of long-term care.  On both economic and recuperative bases, home health care will continue to grow as an essential service for individuals, for families and for the community as a whole.

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Former U.S. Senator Olympia Snowe (R-ME)

NCOA is excited to be part of this great event and honored to have such influential award winners in the field of aging.

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National Council of Aging

Health care at home…is something we need more of, not less of.  Let us make a commitment to preventive and long-term care.  Let us encourage home care as an alternative to nursing homes and give folks a little help to have their parents there.

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Former President Bill Clinton

13FMhead

Educational Session Descriptions


Track 1: Hospice

Session 101—Future Directions: Evaluating and Executing a Palliative Care Strategy

Monday, July 29, 2013 • 2:30 p.m. to 4:10 p.m.

Is palliative care in your strategic plan? This program will help you understand the complexities of palliative care services and the opportunities that go along with it. It explores the financial feasibility of developing this service for your hospice program.

Objectives:

  1. Describe the types of palliative care programs that operate today
  2. Identify the services that are provided in a palliative care program and how palliative care is reimbursed
  3. Recognize the issues involved in integrating palliative care with home health agency and hospice programs
  4. Interpret how a community-based palliative care program integrates with a hospital palliative care program

Faculty: Bill Musick, BS, MBA, CHC, Consultant Projects Manager Senior Associate, The Corridor Group, Overland Park, KS; Diana Franchitto, MBA, President & CEO, Home Care & Hospice of New England, Providence, RI; and Robert Parker, RN, MSN Ed., CHPN, Program Manager, AseraCare Palliative Medicine, Austin, TX

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE)


Session 201—Improving Your Hospice Services’ Bottom Line: Cost Efficiency in Tighter Reimbursement

Monday, July 29, 2013 • 4:20 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

The program will discuss the challenges for hospice providers in maintaining stable and profitable operations while improving clinical outcomes. The understanding and use of key metrics to measure profitability for hospice will be discussed. This program will address the cost indicators that must be understood in making decisions of owning a general inpatient facility. This program will provide an overview of other specialty services provided by hospices such as pediatric hospice and palliative care programs.

Objectives:

  1. Identify an optimum clinical model to improve efficiencies and productivity while improving clinical and financial outcomes
  2. Recognize the costs and methods to achieve efficiencies in managing a hospice inpatient facility
  3. Identify key metrics for hospice program success
  4. List hospice fundraising opportunities

Faculty: Andrea L. Devoti, MSN, MBA, CHCE, President & CEO, Neighborhood Health Agencies, West Chester, PA; David Berman, CPA, CVA, Principal, Simione Healthcare Consultants, LLC, Hamden, CT

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN)


Session 301—Modeling Hospice Changes to Prepare For Medicare Reimbursement and Care Delivery Reform

Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • 8:00 a.m. to 9:40 a.m.

This program will provide insight into current and anticipated reimbursement challenges that Medicare hospice providers face in the coming years, with special emphasis on the status of hospice payment reform. A panel of hospice experts drawn from NAHC membership will present updates on the status of pending changes in hospice payment reform and how their organizations are preparing to meet the current and upcoming challenges.

Objectives:

  1. Identify the makeup and status of Medicare hospice reimbursement reform
  2. Identify the best steps to take now in preparation for reimbursement reform
  3. Interpret the position of hospice services in broad-based health care delivery reforms

Faculty: Steven Lancman, MBA, BSE, Director of Hospice Finance, Visiting Nurse Service of New York, New York, NY; Robert Simione, BS, Managing Principal, Simione Healthcare Consultants, LLC, Hamden, CT; and Patrick Brown, BA, CFO, Penn Home Care and Hospice Services, UPHS, Bala Cynwyd, PA

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE)


Session 401— Minimize Reimbursement Risks: Keys to Developing a Successful hospice Compliance Audit Program for Billing

Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • 10:00 a.m. to 11:40 a.m.

This program focuses on how to design and implement a hospice billing compliance audit process. A properly constructed billing compliance program includes a combination of processes and measures that ensure the acceptance of patients and submission of billings within Medicare coverage guidelines. With increased oversight and scrutiny in hospice, comprehensive compliance strategies are essential to operational safety and success.

Objectives:

  1. Discuss the reasons for implementation of a billing compliance audit program and how to begin this process
  2. Describe the key elements in creating a successful billing compliance audit team
  3. Explain the key steps in developing a billing compliance audit tool and process, including determination of potential risk and implementation of specific action steps to identify potential areas of risk

Faculty: Anne Mattson, RN, BSN, MSN, Director of Compliance and Regulatory, Transpirus, LLC, Huntersville, NC; Teresa Mack, Director Revenue Cycle Services, Transpirus, LLC, Huntersville, NC

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN)

Track 2: Home Health

Session 102 —  Medicaid Home Care: Adjusting to the Changes Successfully

Monday, July 29, 2013 • 2:30 p.m. to 4:10 p.m.

Medicaid home care is the largest publicly-funded home care program with over $40 billion in annual spending through state Medicaid programs across the country. It is also the most varied, with benefits available for children, adults, and the elderly including skilled care, high-tech supports, and personal care services. Medicaid is undergoing seismic changes nationwide with a combination of dramatic increases in Medicaid beneficiaries through the Affordable Care Act to wholesale delivery and financing reforms. Two of the biggest Medicaid changes affecting home care are the shift to Managed Long Term Services and Supports (MLTSS) and the implementation of demonstration programs that merge funding and care management of dual Medicare-Medicaid eligibles. With these changes, a Medicare home health agency may need to become a Medicaid provider as well. This program provides an overview of the states’ movement to Medicaid managed care and the issues presented therein. The program also focuses on strategies to turn these changes into home care opportunities as Medicaid seeks ways to control long-term care spending. In addition, the program addresses successful approaches to Medicaid pricing in managed care and systems for integrated care.

Objectives:

  1. Identify the types of financing and care delivery reforms affecting Medicaid home care
  2. Recognize the opportunities that Medicaid managed long term care presents to home care and how to maximize these opportunities
  3. Manage in the development of pricing and service integration strategies in Medicaid managed care

Faculty: Michelle Martin, Director of Policy, National Association for Home Care & Hospice, Washington, DC; Steven Postal, JD, Director of Medicaid Resource Center, National Association for Home Care & Hospice, Washington, DC; Bob Creamer, Chairman, Loving Care Agency, Inc., Hasbrouck Heights, NJ


Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE)


Session 202 — Home Health Care Costs: Finding Even More Efficiencies

Monday, July 29, 2013 • 4:20 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Medicare home health payment rates for 2013 are virtually unchanged from 2012 rates. When considering the likelihood of a 2 percent sequestration for deficit reduction, the 2013 payments will fall well below 2012 levels. The outlook for 2014 is no brighter with rate rebasing combined with expected continuation of sequestration and “coding creep” adjustments. At the same time, costs continue to increase with new Medicare regulatory requirements, labor shortages, and modernization efforts in technology and delivery models. This means that home health agencies need to get even more creative to find ways to reduce costs. This program offers insights and ideas on successful ways to squeeze out even more efficiencies than you thought possible. Everything from back office costs to care utilization must be on the table for consideration.

Objectives:

  1. Identify the factors that are increasing costs and reducing Medicare payments
  2. Recognize methods to accurately calculate costs to deliver care and each element of costs
  3. Select the best strategies for cost control and expanded efficiencies in back office staffing, clinical services, operational management, and technological support

Faculty: Walter Borginis, CPA, MBA, CFO, Executive Vice President-Finance & Administration, VNA of Greater Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA; Joshua Sullivan, BSBA, Budget Coordinator, VNA of Greater Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA; and Rob Simione, BS, CPA, Vice President, Simione Financial Monitor, White Plains, NY

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN)


Session 302 — Top Business Intelligence Tools to Improve Financial Performance

Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • 8:00 a.m. to 9:40 a.m.

All CEOs and CFOs need the best tools to achieve the most successful financial outcomes. With ever-restricted Medicare home health payment rates and increasing pressures in Medicare Advantage, the tool box needs to be regularly checked and restocked with state-of-the-art data, metrics, analytics, and cost saving technologies. This program lays out the best tools available to get the job done right, on time, and well within budget. It explores current metrics of success under 2013 reimbursement streams, sets out methods to properly cost out managed care services, turns raw data into analytics, and helps you operationalize to achieve the desired metric results. The program also covers the application of technologies in improved financial performance relative to cost management, labor, revenue cycle and cash flow, clinical outcome management and health records connectivity and interoperability. It is all about having the best tools and knowing how to use them!

Objectives:

  1. Identify relevant performance metrics in Medicare home health costs, revenue, and productivity
  2. Compare Medicare Advantage home health to traditional fee-for-service in terms of costs, revenue, and other key benchmarks
  3. Recognize what technology-based tools are available to use to improve cost management

Faculty: Melinda Gaboury, COS-C, BBA, CEO, Healthcare Provider Solutions, Inc., Nashville, TN;  Aaron Little, CPA, Director, BKD, LLP, Springfield, MO; and Timothy J. Rowan, BA, MA, President and Lead Consultant, Rowan Consulting Associates, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/BMO)


Session 402 — Budgeting and Forecasting to Meet Your Strategic Planning Needs in Home Health

Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • 10:00 a.m. to 11:40 a.m.

Extended budgeting in home health services has never been easy with the every-changing reimbursement environment. However, it is still crucial to improve on operational and financial stability. This program covers the essential tools and processes needed to do 1, 3, and 5 year budgeting and forecasting. This approach will help you achieve a proper balance between investments, cost containment, and revenue control. Technological investments, new program developments to compete in a changing delivery system, clinical outcome improvement investment, and cash flow for current needs are all implicated in budgeting and forecasting.

Objectives:

  1. Use essential tools for long-term budgeting in home health services
  2. Identify the factors relevant to long-term budgeting and the range of variation in those factors
  3. Explain the budgeting safeguards and contingencies necessary in a Medicare home health program budget and forecast

Faculty: Christopher Attaya, MBA, FHFMA, CFO, Visiting Nursing Service of Boston, Charlestown, MA; Paul Giles, Director of Home Health Finance, Dignity Health Care, Yorba Linda, CA

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA)

Track 3: Management/Leadership ACA

Session 103 — The Affordable Care Act: Is Your Organization At Risk of the ACA Penalty Tax in 2014?

Monday, July 29, 2013 • 2:30 p.m. to 4:10 p.m.

The Affordable Care Act includes an ”Employer Mandate” that does not require employers to provide health insurance to employees, but does penalize many employers that do not. The ACA and its implementing regulations include complex and often confusing standards for determining whether an employer is subject to the mandates and how to calculate any financial penalties. This program provides an in-depth review of the ACA standards and detailed guidance on determining its impact on home care and hospice employers.

Objectives:

  1. Identify when an employer is classified as a “small employer” and a “large employer”
  2. Interpret how to calculate the number of full-time employees and full-time-equivalent employees for purposes of determining how the ACA will impact employers
  3. Recognize the standards for small employers to qualify for a health insurance subsidy
  4. Identify the steps necessary to use the safe harbor look-back method of determining which employees will be considered “full-time” in 2014
  5. Describe how work hours are calculated for special employee types such as seasonal employees, new employees, part-time employees, and employees with ongoing varied work schedules

Faculty: William A. Dombi, Esq., Vice President for Law, National Association for Home Care & Hospice; Executive Director, Home Care & Hospice Financial Managers Association, Executive Director, National Council on Medicaid Home Care, Washington, DC


Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE)


Session 203 — ACA Employer Mandates: Strategies to Reduce Costs and Risks

Monday, July 29, 2013 • 4:20 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

The prospect of significant financial penalties for employers that do not provide comprehensive health insurance to all employees has triggered intensified evaluation of operational change by home care and hospice organizations. This program is an overview of the various options available to employers to reduce or eliminate the financial penalties including adjustments to employee working hours, compensation levels, and organizational size and structure. In addition, the program provides a method for comparing prospective penalty cost and the cost of a qualified health insurance plan.

Objectives:

  1. Identify the employment options available to large employers to reduce or eliminate financial penalties occurring in the absence of a qualified health insurance plan
  2. Recognize any options available to home care and hospice entities to mitigate ACA penalty risks through a corporate re-organization of their structure
  3. Identify strategies for increased revenues to offset ACA employer mandate costs, including third-party payer rate increases and private pay services charge adjustments
  4. Define the interrelationship between changes instituted to address the ACA mandates and employee compensation requirements under the Fair Labor Standards Act

Faculty: Gary R. Massey, BA, CPA, Partner, Home Care & Hospice, CliftonLarsonAllen, LLP, Charlotte, NC; Karen Thomas, BS, CPA, Partner, CliftonLarsonAllen, LLP, Charlotte, NC

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE)


Session 303 — Finance Leadership as Strategic Team Leader in Home Care: Elevating the “Bean Counters’” Role

Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • 8:00 a.m. to 9:40 a.m.

The challenges for home care and hospice financial managers in maintaining profitable operations while improving patient outcomes will require a partnership of financial and clinical leadership staff. Productivity, case capacity and outcome achievement in the new health care environment indicates the necessity for a team of knowledgeable managers to drive organizational performance. Realistic goal expectations should include clinical as well as financial operational measurements that are developed and understood by all leadership responsible for successful operations of the organization. This program explores how a home care financial leader can take on the role of a strategic overall team leader to bring about organizational success.

Objectives:

  1. Identify how to drive accountability and incentives for financial and clinical success throughout the organization
  2. Recognize how to optimize engagement of employees by aligning financial and clinical operations metrics
  3. Identify best practices for managing the numbers to reduce costs, improve care quality and improve patient capacity

Faculty: Mark Sharp, CPA, Partner, BKD, LLP, Springfield, MO; Karen Vance, OTR, BKD, LLP, Colorado Springs, CO

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN)


Session 403 — Defining and Driving Value: Provider and Payer Perspectives

Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • 10:00 a.m. to 11:40 a.m.

How many times have you heard “value” being used related to service and payment? Why the focus on value? This program will provide insight into the differences in defining and marketing your value to various stakeholders. The program also focuses on preparing your organization with the data to succeed in a value-based payment future.

Objectives:

  1. Describe what the data needs are that drive a stakeholder-specific marketing plan based on value
  2. Describe how to measure value and secure evidence-based data to fit the perspective of various stakeholders such as a hospital, ACO, managed care payer, and direct consumer
  3. Identify strategic steps today to prepare for a value-based payment system in the future

Faculty: Donna Deblois, RN, BSW, MSB, MBA, AHAC, Executive Director, Kno-Wal-Lin Home Care and Hospice, an affiliate of Pen Bay Healthcare, Rockland, ME; Amy Warrington, BA, Director of Business Operations, Kno-Wal-Lin Home Care and Hospice, an affiliate of Pen Bay Healthcare, Rockland, ME

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE)

Track 4: Care Innovations

Session 204 — Care Integration and Network Models: How to Become a Player

Monday, July 29, 2013 • 4:20 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

A transformation in care delivery is underway nationwide. Spurred on by care leaders and payers alike, all levels of health care are shifting towards integration and outcomes-based performance. Whether through managed care, accountable care organizations, bundled payments, care transition programs, or chronic care management, the health care world is evolving away from fee-basis care. Shared risk, clinical and financial accountability, and value-based purchasing are becoming the standards for health care. This program includes a status report on health care delivery reforms, an overview of where home care and hospice fits in the reforms and how to be best positioned to become a central participant.

Objectives:

  1. Identify the status of various models of health care delivery reform and the position of home care and hospice in them
  2. Interpret the risks and opportunities for home care and hospice in new care delivery models
  3. Identify steps needed to secure a prime participation spot in ACOs, managed care, bundled payment and other reform models

Faculty: Samuel Heller, BA, MBA, Senior Vice President, CFO, Visiting Nurse Service of New York, New York, NY; Chris Palmieri, BS, MHA, President, VNSNY CHOICE, New York, NY

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/BMO)


Session 304 — Reducing Hospital Re-Admissions: Home Care as the Solution

Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • 8:00 a.m. to 9:40 a.m.

This year marks the first time that hospitals will be subjected to financial penalties under Medicare for excessive and avoidable re-admissions. These penalties will be greatly expanded in the future and hospitals are scrambling to institute changes to control their risks. Home care has emerged as one of the best ways for hospitals to limit their exposure and mitigate the level of financial penalties. This program focuses on how to maximize the business opportunities these changes present for home care companies.

Objectives:

  1. Identify the opportunities presented to home health agencies resulting from Medicare penalties on hospitals problems with excessive re-admissions within 30 days of discharge for the same or similar diagnosis
  2. Define what services home care can provide to hospitals to reduce emergency department incidents and re-hospitalizations with patients who do not qualify as homebound for the Medicare home health care benefit
  3. Identify the direct costs related to the services provided and developing price points for selling these services to hospitals

Faculty: Kathy Duckett, PHN, BSN, RN, Director of Training and Development, Sutter Center for Integrated Care, an affiliate of Sutter Health Care at Home, Fairfield, CA; Lynda Laff, RN, BSN, COS-C, Principal, Laff Associates, Hilton Head, SC; Barbara Rosenblum, BSN, MAOM, President and CEO, Strategic Healthcare Programs, LLC, Santa Barbara, CA; and Pat Laff, CPA, Managing Principal, Laff Associates, Hilton Head, SC

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA)


Session 404 — Leveraging Technology to Drive Transformational Change and Innovation

Tuesday, July 30, 2013 • 10:00 a.m. to 11:40 a.m.

A central reason for the opportunities that exist for home care to take a primary role in the transformation of care delivery systems is the increasing availability and use of clinical and operations technologies that improve efficiencies, reduce care risks, and advance clinical outcomes with patients coming home from all settings. These technologies are also creating the means of avoiding hospitalizations overall and maintaining patient safely with care in their own homes. This program focuses on how home care can maximize the value of existing and emerging technologies to become the leader in health care innovation.


Objectives:

  1. Identify the emerging technologies that allow for performance improvement including opportunities presented by cloud computing
  2. Interpret the methods and value in instituting comprehensive connectivity and interoperability
  3. Identify the business issues and available solutions through investing in new health care technologies in an integrated care model

Faculty: William Bassett, BS, Vice President-Home Health Care, Deyta, Louisville, KY; Larry Leahy, BS, MA, MHA, CFO, Foundation Management Services, Denton, TX; and Joe Calcutt, BS, CFO, Liberty Home Care LLC, Wilmington, NC

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/SKA)

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