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Testimonials

In the various roles he has undertaken through the years, Val J. Halamandaris has been a singular driving force behind the policy and program initiatives resulting in the recognition of home health care as a viable alternative to institutionalization. His dedication to consumer advocacy, which enhances the quality of life and dignity of those receiving home health care, merits VNA HealthCare Group’s highest recognition and deepest respect. 

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VNA HealthCare Group

I have the highest respect for them, especially for the nurses, aides and therapists, who devote their lives to caring for people with disabilities, the infirm and dying Americans.  There are few more noble professions.

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President Barack Obama

Home health care agencies do such a wonderful job in this country helping people to be able to remain at home and allowing them to receive services

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U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) Chair, Democratic Steering and Outreach Committee

Home care is a combination of compassion and efficiency.  It is less expensive than institutional care...but at the same time it is a more caring, human, intimate experience, and therefore it has a greater human element...it’s a big mistake not to try to maximize it and find ways to give people the home care option over either nursing homes, hospitals or other institutions

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Former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Newt Gingrich (R-GA)

Medicaid covers long-term care, but only for low-income families.  And Medicare only pays for care that is connected to a hospital discharge....our health care system must cover these vital services...[and] we should promote home-based care, which most people prefer, instead of the institutional care that we emphasize now.

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Former U.S. Senator Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-CD)

We need incentives to...keep people in home health care settings...It’s dramatically less expensive than long term care.

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U.S. Senator John McCain (R-AZ)

 

Home care is clearly the wave of the future. It’s clearly where patients want to be cared for. I come from an ethnic family and when a member of our family is severely ill, we would never consider taking them to get institutional care. That’s true of many families for both cultural and financial reasons. If patients have a choice of where they want to be cared for, where it’s done the right way, they choose home.

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Donna Shalala, former Secretary of Health and Human Services

A couple of years ago, I spent a little bit of time with the National Association for Home Care & Hospice and its president, Val J. Halamandaris, and I was just blown away. What impressed me so much was that they talked about what they do as opposed to just the strategies of how to deal with Washington or Sacramento or Albany or whatever the case may be. Val is a fanatic about care, and it comes through in every way known to mankind. It comes through in the speakers he invites to their events; it comes through in all the stuff he shares.

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Tom Peters, author of In Search of Excellence

Val’s home care organization brings thousands of caregivers together into a dynamic organization that provides them with valuable resources and tools to be even better in their important work. He helps them build self-esteem, which leads to self-motivation.

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Mike Vance, former Dean of Disney and author of Think Out of the Box

Val is one of the greatest advocates for seniors in America. He goes beyond the call of duty every time.

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Arthur S. Flemming, former Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare

Val has brought the problems, the challenges, and the opportunities out in the open for everyone to look at. He is a visionary pointing the direction for us. 

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Margaret (Peg) Cushman, Professor of Nursing and former President of the Visiting Nurses Association

Although Val has chosen to stay in the background, he deserves much of the credit for what was accomplished both at the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging, where he was closely associated with me and at the House Select Committee on Aging, where he was Congressman Claude Pepper’s senior counsel and closest advisor. He put together more hearings on the subject of aging, wrote more reports, drafted more bills, and had more influence on the direction of events than anyone before him or since.

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Frank E. Moss, former U.S. Senator

Val’s most important contribution is pulling together all elements of home health care and being able to organize and energize the people involved in the industry.

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Frank E. Moss, former U.S. Senator

Anyone working on health care issues in Congress knows the name Val J. Halamandaris.

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Kathleen Gardner Cravedi, former Staff Director of the House Select Committee on Aging

Without your untiring support and active participation, the voices of people advocating meaningful and compassionate health care reform may not have been heard by national leaders.

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Michael Sullivan, Former Executive Director, Indiana Association for Home Care

All of us have been members of many organizations and NAHC is simply the best there is. NAHC aspires to excellence in every respect; its staff has been repeatedly honored as the best in Washington; the organization lives by the highest values and has demonstrated a passionate interest in the well-being of patients and providers.

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Elaine Stephens, Director of Home Care of Steward Home Care/Steward Health Systems and former NAHC C

Home care increasingly is one of the basic building blocks in the developing system of long-term care.  On both economic and recuperative bases, home health care will continue to grow as an essential service for individuals, for families and for the community as a whole.

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Former U.S. Senator Olympia Snowe (R-ME)

NCOA is excited to be part of this great event and honored to have such influential award winners in the field of aging.

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National Council of Aging

Health care at home…is something we need more of, not less of.  Let us make a commitment to preventive and long-term care.  Let us encourage home care as an alternative to nursing homes and give folks a little help to have their parents there.

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Former President Bill Clinton

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Educational Session Descriptions

Track 1: Home Health

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101. Cost Control Strategies – Do You Really Know Your Agency’s Cost Structure? 

Monday, July 14, 2014 • 2:30 p.m. to 4:10 p.m.

The challenges for home care financial managers in maintaining profitable operations while improving patient outcomes will require an understanding of all costs and how they relate to different reimbursement models.   In particular, it is important to be able to calculate your costs of care and understand how these costs relate to payment received.  Additionally, non-clinical costs must be measured and managed in accordance with industry benchmarks.   This program will equip you to better measure all costs of your operation and compare them to industry benchmarks.

Objectives:

  • Identify direct and indirect costs and understand the relationship of costs to multiple reimbursement models. 
  • Gain a better understanding of non-clinical and back-office costs and become able to evaluate operational cost structures compared to industry benchmarks
  • Utilize industry benchmarks to evaluate the operating costs and revenues.

Faculty: David Berman, CPA, CVA, Principal, Simione Healthcare Consultants, LLC, Hamden, CT; Andrea L. Devoti, MSN, MBA, CHCE, President & CEO, Neighborhood Health Agencies, West Chester, PA; Rob Simione, BS, CPA, Vice President, Simione Financial Monitor, White Plains, NY

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN)


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201. Home Health Cost Containment Strategies

Monday, July 14, 2014 • 4:20 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Faced with Medicare rate cuts of 3.5% from rebasing in 2014 with additional cuts scheduled for the next 3 years alongside shifts to a managed care payment model, Home Health agencies need to find new sources of cost savings and operating efficiencies in order to survive.  Building upon the recently released HHFMA White Paper on cost containment strategies, this program offers insights and ideas on successful ways to squeeze out even more efficiencies than you thought possible. Everything from back office costs to care utilization must be on the table for consideration.

Objectives:

  • Identify the factors that are driving costs and learn how to better manage them.
  • Recognize methods to accurately calculate costs to deliver care and each element of costs
  • Select the best strategies for cost control and expanded efficiencies in back office staffing, clinical services, operational management, and technological support.
  • Evaluate transportation management opportunities   
  • Identify models that utilize technology to reduce operating costs

Faculty: Walter Borginis, CPA, MBA, CFO, Executive Vice President-Finance & Administration, VNA of Greater Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA;  Rob Simione, BS, CPA, Vice President, Simione Financial Monitor, White Plains, NY; Shawn Ricketts,  BBA, MBA, CPA, CFO ,Heritage Home Healthcare & Hospice , Albuquerque, NM

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN)


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301. Episode Management: Managing Clinical and Financial Outcomes Before They Occur

Tuesday, July 15, 2014 • 8:00 a.m. to 9:40 a.m.

The success of care management in home health requires a shift in focus from making visits to managing episodes of care. Accountable care can be defined as a shift from volume-based health care to value-based health care. Effective care management reinforces that no cost should be added to an episode without adding value to the outcome. Episode Management provides the structure for concurrent monitoring of clinical and financial outcomes while there is still influence of control during the episode.

Objectives:

  • List the key performance indicators affecting both clinical and financial outcomes of a home health episode of care
  • Describe the structure, process and players operationalizing Episode Management in a home health agency
  • Explain how Episode Management influences outcomes before they occur

Faculty: Mike Dordick, BS, Senior Vice President, Principal, McBee Associates, Wayne, PA; Dawn Cheek, RN, BSN, Senior Manager, McBee Associates, Inc., Wayne, PA

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/MAS)


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401. Minimize Denials:  Practicing Effective Home Care Compliance

Tuesday, July 15, 2014 • 10:00 a.m. to 11:40 a.m.

Home Care is being more scrutinized that ever before.  The ADR, RA, ZPIC and other reviews seem to be out of control!  The best defense is a good compliance offense. Agencies cannot just talk about compliance.  Agencies must put processes in place to ensure they compliance is monitored.  Learn the common documentation flaws and operational practices, including failure to conduct appropriate pre-billing audits, that could increase your compliance risk.  In addition, when denials occur, appeals are necessary!  This session will educate financial managers on monitoring of high compliance risks areas in the agency and share key tips on effective appeals.

Objectives:

  • Recognize critical role of home health managers in agency compliance
  • Apply practical tips for day to day management of compliance effectiveness
  • Review effective approach for monitoring denials and filing appeals

Faculty: Melinda Gaboury, COS-C, BBA, Chief Executive Officer, Healthcare Provider Solutions, Inc., Nashville, TN;  Steve Telles, Consultant, Management Consulting Services, Albuquerque, NM

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE)

Track 2: Hospice

102. Hospice Payment Refinement – Where it Stands and How Hospices Can Prepare

Monday, July 14, 2014 • 2:30 p.m. to 4:10 p.m.

Since 2010, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has been examining hospice payment -- and practice -- with an eye toward revising the payment system for, at a minimum, the routine home care (RHC) level of care.  Based on a wide variety of concerns that have arisen as a result of their study, CMS has now determined that a focus on filling data gaps, clarifying the hospice “bundle” and addressing program integrity concerns must take precedence, and payment reform efforts will follow.  What does this mean for hospices over the near term, and how can they prepare now for future payment changes?

Objectives:

  • Identify questionable hospice practices that CMS is focusing on as part of its payment reform study.
  • Describe key elements that CMS has under consideration for inclusion as part of future payment reform changes.
  • Outline steps hospices can take to identify risk areas (including questionable care patterns) and the financial impact of payment changes.

Faculty: Theresa M. Forster, Vice President for Hospice Policy & Programs, NAHC, Washington, DC; Robert J. Simione, BS, Managing Principal, Simione Healthcare Consultants, LLC, Hamden, CT

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN)


202. Hospice Regulatory Change is Inevitable: Are We Prepared and What Will Medicare Learn from the Data? 

Monday, July 14, 2014 • 4:20 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

The pace of regulatory and legislative changes in the hospice industry is at an all time high.  Much more attention is being paid to a hospice patient who has elected the Medicare hospice benefit.  This session will discuss the status of several regulatory changes that have or will occur in the hospice industry. We will discuss the additional burden placed on hospices to report additional patient-specific data elements, what impact it has on an agency and the industry and what Medicare will learn from this additional information.

Objectives:

  • Describe and discuss rationale behind recent changes made to reporting visits, describe and discuss rationale behind recent changes made to add patient level pharmacy costs
  • Describe and discuss the conversion from ICD-9 diagnosis coding to ICD-10 diagnosis coding
  • Describe and discuss the hospice item set
  • Describe and discuss regulatory policy, and legislative issues on the periphery of hospice and how this may change
  • Discuss the impact that these changes will have on the industry, discuss future regulatory and legislative changes under consideration

Faculty: Katie Wehri, Hospice Regulatory and Operations Specialist, NAHC, Washington, DC; M. Aaron Little, CPA, Director, BKD, LLP, Springfield, MO

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE)


302. Hospice Compliance: Issues and Mitigating Risk

Tuesday, July 15, 2014 • 8:00 a.m. to 9:40 a.m.

Regulatory enforcement actions for health care fraud reached an all-time high in FY2013, and hospice is now clearly in the sights of regulators.  This program will help you understand the key areas of enforcement, what to expect in an audit or investigation, and how you may be able to mitigate your risk for prepayment denial, recoupment or an enforcement action.

Objectives:

  • Identify top compliance risks being targeted by regulators
  • Recognize how to mitigate risk for prepayment denials or post-payment recoupments
  • Articulate key steps in take when a regulator shows up on your doorstep

Faculty: Bill Musick, BS, MBA,  CHC, Consultant Projects Manager Senior Associate, The Corridor Group, Overland Park, KS; Latour "LT" Lafferty, BA, JD, Partner, Holland & Knight, Tampa, FL

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE)


402. Hospice Cost Savings: Finding Efficiencies

Tuesday, July 15, 2014 • 10:00 a.m. to 11:40 a.m.

The outlook for 2014 Medicare home health and hospice rates are foggy at best with the threat of rate rebasing combined on top of the continuation of sequestration. Costs will continue to increase with new Medicare regulatory requirements, labor shortages, and modernization efforts in technology and delivery models.  These increases are on top of the normal fixed cost increases needed to operate a company. This means that hospice agencies need to get even more creative to find ways to reduce costs. This program offers insights and ideas on successful ways to squeeze out even more efficiencies than you thought possible. Everything from back office costs to care utilization must be on the table for consideration.

Objectives:

  • Recognize methods to accurately calculate costs to deliver care and each element of these costs
  • Identify the factors that are increasing these costs and potentially reducing Medicare payments
  • Select the best strategies for cost control and expand process efficiencies in the back office, clinical services, operational management, and technological support that best decrease the costs needed to run your business

Faculty: Mark Sharp, CPA, Partner, BKD, LLP, Springfield, MO; Kim Vaughn, CPA, Chief Financial Officer, Community Hospice of Texas, Fort Worth, TX

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE)

Track 3: Changing Healthcare Delivery

103. Diversifying Revenue Sources: Bring Balance in Changing Times

Monday, July 14, 2014 • 2:30 p.m. to 4:10 p.m.

Are you looking to diversify your revenue?  This program will provide insight to strategies associated with diversifying an organization revenue models.  There are many things to consider as you evaluate alternative programs from understanding your demographics to the financial feasibility of a particular revenue diversification. There is one thing for sure--- there is no cookie cutter approach to success.  Specific revenue diversification opportunities and models that will be discussed are as follows:

  • Home Care Private duty Services
  • Hospice
  • Palliative Care
  • Tele-Monitoring for non-homebound patients

Objectives:

  • Recognize the importance of revenue diversification in home care and hospice
  • Understand the methods for evaluating the opportunities for revenue diversification
  • Identify the steps needed to plan and implement a diversification into new lins of home care business

Faculty: Mark Sharp, CPA, Partner, BKD, LLP, Springfield, MO

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN)


203. Evolving Payment and Service Models: Blessing or Curse?

Monday, July 14, 2014 • 4:20 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), bundled payment, population health management, and other shifts in payment and service models create a fluid landscape for home health agencies – presenting one more challenge to leaders, but also possibly an opportunity to expand the scope of business and sources of revenue. The first challenge is to understand the terms and how the different models work; the second is to identify how your agency might successfully operate under these non-traditional programs. Take advantage of this session to learn first-hand from financial leaders currently working with ACOs and bundled payment demonstration projects.

Objectives:

  • Describe the structure of ACOs and bundled payment demonstration projects in effect today
  • Anticipate future trends around new payment models and provider partnerships
  • Recognize key relationship and financial management components involved
  • Identify how to evaluate your agency’s readiness for new payment structures
  • Determine elements of successful non-traditional payment contracts and management strategies

Moderator: John C. Richter, CPA, Chief Strategy Officer – Industries, Clifton Larson-Allen, LLP, Charlotte, NC

Faculty: Michael Slavik, CPA, Chief Industry Officer – Health Care, Clifton Larson-Allen, LLP, Charlotte NC ; Samuel Heller, BA, MBA, Senior Vice President and CFO, Visiting Nurse Service of New York, New York

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN)


303. Home Care and Hospice’s Role in an Integrated Health System

Tuesday, July 15, 2014 • 8:00 a.m. to 9:40 a.m.

This panel program of senior leaders from  integrated health systems will discuss the growing and evolving role of home care and hospice in the new approaches to the delivery of care. The program will focus on what has worked and what has not. The lessons learned will include discussion of management, clinical, data,  communication, and financial integration issues.

Objectives:

  • Describe how these home care businesses integrate into their health system on a strategic and tactical level
  • Demonstrate the successes achieved or anticipated by being part of an integrated system
  • Delineate the challenges and frustrations faced by their organization because of their structural relationships

Faculty: Moderator-William J. Simione III, BS, Principal, Simione Healthcare Consultants, LLC, Hamden, CT
Faculty: Patrick Brown, BA, CFO, Penn Home Care and Hospice Services, UPHS, Bala Cynwyd, PA; Michael Puskarich, MBA, VP, Finance, Visiting Nurse Service at St Francis, At Your Service Home Care at St. Francis, Indianapolis, IN; Donna DeBlois, RN, BSW, MSN, MBA, AHAC, Executive Director, Kno-Wal-Lin Home Care and Hospice, an affiliate of Pen Bay Healthcare, Rockland, ME; Paul Giles, BS,  Director, Home Health Finance, Dignity Health Care, Yorba Linda, CA

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/BMO)


403 Accessing Capital:  Strategies for Funding Cash Flow Needs

Tuesday, July 15, 2014 • 10:00 a.m. to 11:40 a.m.

To survive and thrive in today’s home care and hospice environment, access to capital may be a necessity.  Common strategies for success, such as initiatives for expansion, innovation in care delivery, and technology implementation, usually require a substantial investment of capital.  Increased compliance reviews and new regulatory requirements could delay payments and create the temporary need for cash to fund operations.  Despite the increasing need for capital, the sources have become more difficult to come by in today’s economic climate.  This workshop will focus on creative strategies and alternatives for gaining access to capital to meet all your business goals.

Objectives:

  • Identify the options for home care and hospice agencies to consider in accessing capital.
  • Discuss the pros and cons of the different capital options.
  • Describe how to best position your agency for success in accessing the capital markets.

Faculty: Doug Gordon, BS, Co-Founder & EVP, Fundation, Inc.,New York, NY; TBD

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN)

Track 4: Leadership

104. Managing within Managed Care: Lessons Learned in Home Care

Monday, July 14, 2014 • 2:30 p.m. to 4:10 p.m.

Over the last several years, managed care has become a significant part of life in home care. Medicare Advantage enrollment has increased along with a growing shift to managed Medicaid, particularly Managed Long Term Services and supports. While traditional fee-for-services remains the dominate source of business on home care, working within a managed care system is an essential part of today's operations. This program is a "lessons learned" workshopon managed home care. Led by a distinguished panel of home care executives with extensive experiences in managed care, the program is intended to unveil the secrets to successful management of managed home care.

Objectives:

  • Identify the key issues in managed home care operations.
  • Recognize how managed care organizations perceive and understand home care services.
  • Identify stepsto achieve administrative efficiencies and consistent program operations in managed home care.

Faculty: Mitchel Morel, BA, CPA,  CFO, Senior Home Care; Lynne Hebert, RN,  Vice President of Clinical Operations, Senior Home Care, affiliate of Kindred at Home,
Clearwater, FL

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN)


204. Medicaid Managed Home Care: This is the Future!

Monday, July 14, 2014 • 4:20 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Medicaid is the largest public payer of home care services in the US. With a variety of benefit programs that cover children, persons with disabilities, and the elderly, Medicaid serves over 5 million people in home care, spending in excess of $30 billion annually. Traditionally all long term services and supports (LTSS) have been “carved out” of contracts between states and managed care organizations (MCO), meaning states retained management for the populations receiving LTSS. Likewise, Medicare home health and Medicaid home care have operated in separate silos even though the patient populations overlap. Now, as states are in the process of developing and implementing managed long term services and supports (MLTSS) programs. In addition, some states dual-eligible demonstration programs are emerging at a rapid pace, leaving home care providers and MCOs to develop paths to work together in very short order. This program will feature a panel from the home care and Medicaid managed care industries, each discussing their experience with the move of the LTSS and duals populations into managed care, pitfalls, opportunities for improvement, and the future of managed long term services and supports.

Objectives:

  • Recognize the political and health policy landscape of Medicaid and Medicare reform that shifts LTSS and dual-eligible populations into managed care
  • Identify the role and placement of home care in Medicaid managed LTSS
  • Identify areas for potential cooperation between providers and health plans
  • Recognize the opportunities that Medicaid managed long term services and supports present to home care and how to maximize these opportunities

Moderator: Michelle Martin, Policy Director, National Council on Medicaid Home Care, Washington, DC

Panelists: Michael Kinne, BA, EVP/Chief Operating Offficer, The Whitaker Kinne Group, LLC, Chicago, IL; Darby Anderson, BS, Senior Vice President, Addus Homecare Corporation, Palatine, IL; David Tramontana, BS, Chief Executive Officer/Owner,  HomeCare Black Stone, Cincinnati, OH; William Gerardi, BS, MD, MBA,  Aetna Better Health, Chicago, IL

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN)


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304. Revenue Cycle Management: Protecting Cash Flow through Efficiency, Effectiveness & Compliance

Tuesday, July 15, 2014 • 8:00 a.m. to 9:40 a.m.

Today’s home health and hospice revenue cycles are challenged by a shifting payer mix from traditional Medicare and Medicaid to commercial and managed care payers and ever increasing billing regulations, while revenues are threatened by heightened program integrity contractor activity.  It is critical now more than ever to ensure revenue cycle performance promotes fluid and optimal cash flow in the most efficient, effective, and compliant manner, as agencies cannot afford to lose revenues due to avoidable write-off situations.  Understanding the influence of operations on the revenue cycle is critical to optimizing cash flow and avoiding unnecessary compliance risks.  Managing the revenue cycle must include a means of monitoring evolving clinical and related processes that are key performance influencers.  This workshop will focus on evaluating, measuring, and managing revenue cycle performance as a means of optimizing and protecting cash flow and reducing compliance risks.

Objectives:

  • Identify typical internal and external threats to and weaknesses in revenue cycle performance.
  • Compare revenue cycle performance metrics against industry benchmarks.
  • Select strategies that optimize revenue cycle performance management.

Moderator: Tiffany Karlin, BS, Director, of Healthcare Sevices, Mueller Prost, PC, St. Louis, MO

Panelists:Deborah Miller, BS, Billing Manager, Mueller Prost PC, St. Lois, MO Tom Keyer, Cost Report and Reimbursement Consultant, Mueller Prost PC; St. Louis, MO; Gregory Pfeuffer, BS, CPA, Senior Manager, Consulting Services, Mueller Prost, PC, St. Louis, MO; Jeff Clayton, Practice Director, McBee Associates Inc., Columbia, MD; Sarah Shelbourne, BS, CFO, Optimal Health Services, Bakersfield, CA

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/FIN)


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404. Medicaid Rate Advocacy: Succeeding in Getting Fair Payment

Tuesday, July 15, 2014 • 10:00 a.m. to 11:40 a.m.

Medicaid home care payment rates are often far below the cost of the care delivered and require providers to subsidize Medicaid financial losses.  There is hope as there are some steps that can be taken to improve payment rates. This program will present the experiences of several states that have grappled with Medicaid home care rates with some success, focusing on creating an evidentiary base for rate advocacy that can prevail in the always difficult political climate of state Medicaid programs.

Objectives:

  • Identify sources of financial data that can be used to support revisions in payment rates
  • Recognize the state and federal legal standards for Medicaid payment rates
  • Define the techniques that can be used in Medicaid rate advocacy with state Medicaid programs and state legislatures.

Faculty: William A.  Dombi, Esq., Vice President for Law, National Association for Home Care & Hospice, Executive Director, National Council on Medicaid Home Care, Washington, DC;  David Totaro, BA, MBA, Chair, National Council on Medicaid Home Care, Washington, DC; Tim Rogers, BA, Executive Committee Member, National Council on Medicaid Home Care, Washington, DC

Course Level: Intermediate; Nursing 1.6 CEs; Accounting 2.0 CPEs (NASBA/RE)

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