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Testimonials

In the various roles he has undertaken through the years, Val J. Halamandaris has been a singular driving force behind the policy and program initiatives resulting in the recognition of home health care as a viable alternative to institutionalization. His dedication to consumer advocacy, which enhances the quality of life and dignity of those receiving home health care, merits VNA HealthCare Group’s highest recognition and deepest respect. 

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VNA HealthCare Group

I have the highest respect for them, especially for the nurses, aides and therapists, who devote their lives to caring for people with disabilities, the infirm and dying Americans.  There are few more noble professions.

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President Barack Obama

Home health care agencies do such a wonderful job in this country helping people to be able to remain at home and allowing them to receive services

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U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) Chair, Democratic Steering and Outreach Committee

Home care is a combination of compassion and efficiency.  It is less expensive than institutional care...but at the same time it is a more caring, human, intimate experience, and therefore it has a greater human element...it’s a big mistake not to try to maximize it and find ways to give people the home care option over either nursing homes, hospitals or other institutions

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Former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Newt Gingrich (R-GA)

Medicaid covers long-term care, but only for low-income families.  And Medicare only pays for care that is connected to a hospital discharge....our health care system must cover these vital services...[and] we should promote home-based care, which most people prefer, instead of the institutional care that we emphasize now.

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Former U.S. Senator Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-CD)

We need incentives to...keep people in home health care settings...It’s dramatically less expensive than long term care.

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U.S. Senator John McCain (R-AZ)

 

Home care is clearly the wave of the future. It’s clearly where patients want to be cared for. I come from an ethnic family and when a member of our family is severely ill, we would never consider taking them to get institutional care. That’s true of many families for both cultural and financial reasons. If patients have a choice of where they want to be cared for, where it’s done the right way, they choose home.

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Donna Shalala, former Secretary of Health and Human Services

A couple of years ago, I spent a little bit of time with the National Association for Home Care & Hospice and its president, Val J. Halamandaris, and I was just blown away. What impressed me so much was that they talked about what they do as opposed to just the strategies of how to deal with Washington or Sacramento or Albany or whatever the case may be. Val is a fanatic about care, and it comes through in every way known to mankind. It comes through in the speakers he invites to their events; it comes through in all the stuff he shares.

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Tom Peters, author of In Search of Excellence

Val’s home care organization brings thousands of caregivers together into a dynamic organization that provides them with valuable resources and tools to be even better in their important work. He helps them build self-esteem, which leads to self-motivation.

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Mike Vance, former Dean of Disney and author of Think Out of the Box

Val is one of the greatest advocates for seniors in America. He goes beyond the call of duty every time.

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Arthur S. Flemming, former Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare

Val has brought the problems, the challenges, and the opportunities out in the open for everyone to look at. He is a visionary pointing the direction for us. 

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Margaret (Peg) Cushman, Professor of Nursing and former President of the Visiting Nurses Association

Although Val has chosen to stay in the background, he deserves much of the credit for what was accomplished both at the U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging, where he was closely associated with me and at the House Select Committee on Aging, where he was Congressman Claude Pepper’s senior counsel and closest advisor. He put together more hearings on the subject of aging, wrote more reports, drafted more bills, and had more influence on the direction of events than anyone before him or since.

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Frank E. Moss, former U.S. Senator

Val’s most important contribution is pulling together all elements of home health care and being able to organize and energize the people involved in the industry.

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Frank E. Moss, former U.S. Senator

Anyone working on health care issues in Congress knows the name Val J. Halamandaris.

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Kathleen Gardner Cravedi, former Staff Director of the House Select Committee on Aging

Without your untiring support and active participation, the voices of people advocating meaningful and compassionate health care reform may not have been heard by national leaders.

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Michael Sullivan, Former Executive Director, Indiana Association for Home Care

All of us have been members of many organizations and NAHC is simply the best there is. NAHC aspires to excellence in every respect; its staff has been repeatedly honored as the best in Washington; the organization lives by the highest values and has demonstrated a passionate interest in the well-being of patients and providers.

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Elaine Stephens, Director of Home Care of Steward Home Care/Steward Health Systems and former NAHC C

Home care increasingly is one of the basic building blocks in the developing system of long-term care.  On both economic and recuperative bases, home health care will continue to grow as an essential service for individuals, for families and for the community as a whole.

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Former U.S. Senator Olympia Snowe (R-ME)

NCOA is excited to be part of this great event and honored to have such influential award winners in the field of aging.

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National Council of Aging

Health care at home…is something we need more of, not less of.  Let us make a commitment to preventive and long-term care.  Let us encourage home care as an alternative to nursing homes and give folks a little help to have their parents there.

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Former President Bill Clinton

13AMhead

Nursing Programing Descriptions

Audience Key:
| HH = Home Health | HOS = Hospice | NUR = Nurses |
| PHY = Physicians | PD = Private Duty | TH = Therapists|
 

100 Series – Thursday, October 31, 11:30am – 1pm

101. Depression, Dementia, and Diabetes: A Looming Epidemic for Baby Boomers. Are You Ready?

Millions of Baby Boomers — between 5.6 and 8 million older adults — will face a deadly trail of illnesses: diabetes, depressive disorders and dementia-related behavioral and psychiatric symptoms. These figures suggest both a challenge and a huge opportunity for home health care providers. Data suggests significant opportunities for home health care providers to not only initiate psychiatric home care programs but also to provide training and education to all professional staff regarding the linkages among these three diagnoses — how to identify each of them; how to manage the co-morbidities — including the behavioral and psychiatric problems and to develop a specific skill set in dementia care.

Objectives:

  • Discuss at least three ways that diabetes, depression and dementia not only overlap but increase the acuity of each individual diagnosis
  • Discuss the treatment options for these three overlaping conditions
  • Discuss at least 2 values of adding both a psychiatric as well as a specific dementia program to an organization's home care offerings

Faculty: Verna Carson, PhD, PMH/CNS-BC, President , C&V Senior Care Specialists, Inc, Fallston, MD; Katherine Vanderhorst, RN, BSN, Vice President , C&V Senior Care Specialists, Inc., Williamsville, NY

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.5 nursing CEs; 1.5 CPEs (NASBA/FIN)

Track: Clinical
Audience: | HH | HOS | NUR | PHY | PD | TH


102. 2014 Rebasing: Strategies to Counteract Constant Cuts while Improving Quality of Care

Rebasing of the home health episode payment rate beginning in 2014 has serious implications for providers and the patients served. This session will provide information and guidance on rebasing principles, strategies for improving care practices while implementing changes, and the achievable positive results that can be obtained.

Objectives:

  • Identify the changes under the 2014 HHPPS rebasing model and the impact on home health agency operations and financial outcomes
  • Describe operational best practice and evidence-based practice for agencies to implement to adapt to the incentives and disincentives of PPS 2014 while improving care
  • Describe positive results from utilizing best practice nursing and therapy clinical processes necessary to prevent care delivery premised on financial consequences

Faculty: Laurie Salmons, RN, BSN, Clinical Consulting Manager, McBee Associates, Inc., Wayne, PA; Linda Chambers, PT, BS, Administrative Director, Promedica Home Health Services, Sylvania, OH; Mike  Dordick, CPA, Senior Vice President, Principal, McBee Associates, Wayne, PA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.5 nursing CEs; 1.5 CPEs (NASBA/BMO)

Track: Management & Leadership
Audience: | HH | NUR | TH

 

200 Series – Thursday, October 31, 1:30 – 3pm

201. Creative Teaching Strategies for Educating Remote Home Care Clinicians

Home Care Educators must be flexible and creative in order meet the challenges of educating remote home care staff. This presentation will illustrate creative ways to present materials to assist clinicians. Barriers to educating remote staff and alternative education strategies will be discussed, along with how to teach the concept of home care to nurses orienting to the specialty.

Objectives:

  • Identify the barriers to educating remote staff and providing alternative education strategies for teaching in the field
  • Describe strategies for teaching the concept of home care to nurses orienting to the specialty
  • Compare strategies for effectively educating home care clinicians

Faculty: Mary Beth Hoban, MSN, RN, The Home Care Network, Main Line Health/Jefferson Health System, Radnor, PA; Marion  Glazier, MS , Staff Development and Quality Coordinator, The Home Care Network, Radnor, PA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.5 nursing CEs; 1.5 CPEs (NASBA/SKA)

Track: Clinical
Audience: | HH | HOS | NUR | TH


202. How the Multi-Factorial Falls Risk Assessment Accurately Predicts Risk of Falls in a Homebound Population

Individuals that are a high risk for falls can be successfully identified using the multi-factorial falls risk assessment. Interventions can then be targeted at specific variables that are the most predictive. The presenters will share their findings from a study that demonstrates that individual items in the assessment were not shown to accurately predict risk of falls in isolation. However, when all variables are included in the model, they can work together to significantly predict the risk for a fall.

Objectives:

  • Describe the relationship of total score on the Multifactorial Falls Risk Assessment to falls risk
  • Interpret orrelation between total score and incidence of fall, as well as which individual variables are more predictive of a fall
  • Identify agency practices to specifically target the areas most predictive of falls

Faculty: Michele  James, RN, BSN, MSS, Home  Care Case Manager, The Home Care Network, Radnor, PA; Nancy Kimmons, BS, PT, Home Care Therapy Operations Manager, Rehab Affiliates, division of Main Line Health, Radnor, PA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.5 nursing CEs; 1.5 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); Approved for 1.5 CEs for physical therapists by the Texas Physical Therapy Association (course approval number 47716A)

Track: Clinical
Audience: | HH | HOS | NUR | PD | TH

300 Series – Friday, November 1, 8 – 9:30am

301. Improving Wound Outcomes With a Coordinated Cross-Continuum Wound Service

This presentation will focus on the integration of a wound care team that provides wound and ostomy services across the care continuum. A hospital-based home care agency integrated a wound service across hospital system care settings that improved inpatient outcomes while increasing homecare and outpatient referrals. By merging and cross-training staff, patient satisfaction scores and reportable outcomes have improved.

Objectives:

  • Differentiate between types of wound treatments used in patient care settings and how integration of talent, supplies and treatments improve outcomes between types of wound treatments used in patient care settings and how integration of talent, supplies and treatments improve outcomes
  • Discuss methods of integration of wound services with details provided on operational reorganization to reach improved efficiencies.
  • Explain the success of the program  with illustration by presenting case and providing a roadmap for success.

Faculty: Debra Healey, MSN, RN, CPHRM, Executive Director, Middlesex Hospital, South Windsor, CT

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.5 nursing CEs; 1.5 CPEs (NASBA/SKA)

Track: Clinical
Audience: | HH | HOS | NUR | PHY | TH


302. Tricks or Treats? Home Health Physical Therapy Practice in 2013 and Beyond

Ethical provisions of physical therapy in home health require the management of clinical, operational and regulatory issues. This session brings together expertise in all of these areas to discuss key issues and field participant’s questions. Presenters will discuss clinical decision making that is patient-driven and fiscally responsible, as well as the operational challenges and opportunities for therapy leadership in home health.

Objectives:

  • Discuss clinical decision making that is patient driven and fiscally responsible
  • Interpret he operational challenges and opportunities for therapy leadership in home health
  • Reconize the impact of regulation and payment on therapy referrals and care planning

Faculty: Cindy Krafft, MS, PT, Founding Partner, Kornetti & Krafft Health Care Solutions, Citrus Springs  , FL; Kristin Mattson, PT, Director of Rehabilitation Development, Masonic Health Systems / Overlook Visiting Nurses , Sterling, MA; Diana   Kornetti, MA, PT, HCS-D, COS-C, Administrator and Co-Owner, Integrity Home Health Care, Ocala, FL

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.5 nursing CEs; 1.5 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); Approved for 1.5 CEs for physical therapists by the Texas Physical Therapy Association (course approval number 47716A)

Track: Clinical
Audience: | HH | NUR | TH

 

400 Series – Friday, November 1, 2:30 – 4pm

401. Establishing a Home Health/Hospice Bridge Program for Your Agency

This session will describe a bridge program with home health and hospice using a patient-centered approach to determine the patient’s goals and to provide the right care in the right setting at the right time. Transitional planning is essential for coordination and continuity of care between home care and hospice. When patients transfer from one type of care to the next, that transfer needs to be a coordinated, seamless movement between care partners. Care processes to guide the patient flow, communication, care coordination and tracking tools to support the transition along with education tools for clinicians, patients, family and physician are part of successful bridge programs.

Objectives:

  • Describe components of a bridge program
  • Identify patient characteristics that will indicate a different model of care is needed
  • Describe necessary processes to facilitate a smooth patient transition and apply information to a case study

Faculty: Pamela Teenier, RN, BSN, MBA, COS-C, HCS-D, Assistant Vice President, Transitional Care Service, Gentiva, Corpus Christi, TX; David Eubanks, MSN, RN, Regional VP, Clinical Operations, Gentiva Health Services, Atlanta, GA; Billie Papasifakis, RN, MSN-BC, AACC, AVP Clinical Practice, Research, & Education, Gentiva, Troy, MI

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.5 nursing CEs; 1.5 CPEs (NASBA/SKA)

Track: Clinical
Audience: | HH | HOS | NUR | TH


402. Using Occupational Therapy Services for Affecting Chronic Condition Outcomes

The practice of occupational therapy focuses on engagement in daily life activities. ADLs and IADLs are critical to patients managing their health and staying out of the hospital. This session addresses how daily routines can be used in the self-management of chronic conditions and how appropriate occupational therapy plans of care contribute to improving self-management, regardless of diagnosis.

Objectives:

  • Explain the relationship between daily activity routines and self management of chronic conditions
  • Identify six strategies for using occupational therapy to improve clinical outcomes
  • Evaluate occupational therapy care plans for relevance to health management and clinical outcomes

Faculty: Carol Siebert, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, Occupational Therapist, The Home Remedy, Chapel Hill, NC; Karen Vance, BSOT, OTR, Supervising Consultant, BKD, LLP Health Care Group, Colorado Springs, CO

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.5 nursing CEs; 1.5 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); Approved for 1.5 CEs for physical therapists by the Texas Physical Therapy Association (course approval number 47716A)

Track: Clinical
Audience: | HH | NUR | PHY | TH

 

500 Series – Friday, November 1, 4:15 – 5:45pm

501. Revising the Scope and Standards of Home Health Nursing Practice

This session will enable attendees to participate in revising the Scope and Standards of Home Health Nursing Practice documentation for the next decade. First developed by an ANA taskforce in 1986, the Scope and Standards of Home Health Nursing Practice were updated in 1992, 1999 and 2007 to reflect the shifting challenges and trends facing home health nurses. Besides state Nurse Practice Acts, the most authoritative source for professional home health nurse practice is the American Nurse Association’s Scope and Standards of Home Health Nursing Practice. Nurses, administrators, litigators, policy makers and the public use this document to evaluate the role and practice of home health nurses.

Objectives:

  • Discuss the purpose, history and revision process of the ANA's Scope and Standards for Home Health Nursing Practice
  • Explain the current scope and the 15 standards of home health nursing practice
  • Present revisions to the Scope and Standards to reflect practice into the next decade

Faculty: Marilyn Harris, MSN, RN, NEA, BC, FAAN, Consultant, Retired/Self-Employed, Hatboro, PA; Lisa Gorski, RN, MS, HHCNS-BC, CRNI, FAAN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice, Milwaukee, WI; Mary Narayan, MSN, RN, HHCNS-BC, COS-C, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Narayan Associates, Vienna, VA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.5 nursing CEs; 1.5 CPEs (NASBA/SKA)

Track: Clinical
Audience: | HH | NUR |


502. The Role of the Home Health Therapist in Care Transitions Rehospitalizations Reduction

This session will discuss the use of care team collaboration and therapy best practices to minimize hospital readmissions and improve the overall quality of patient care. Presenters will discuss how therapists’ relationships with their inpatient colleagues can help provide seamless transition to home during the “hand-off” from inpatient facilities to home care settings.

Objectives:

  • Demonstrate how home health therapists are an integral part of the care team in transitioning to home
  • Describe the importance of the home health therapists receiving the "hand-off"
  • Discuss the home health therapists' role in patient independence and well-being

Faculty: Theresa Gates, PT, Clinical Content Developer/Home Health Consultant, CareAnyware, Jacksonville, FL

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.5 nursing CEs; 1.5 CPEs (NASBA/SKA); Approved for 1.5 CEs for physical therapists by the Texas Physical Therapy Association (course approval number 47716A)

Track: Clinical
Audience: | HH | NUR | PHY | TH

 

600 Series – Saturday, November 2, 8 – 9:30am

601. Integrating Chronic Care Methods to Improve Patient Outcomes

This presentation will provide attendees with tools to facilitate successful integration of chronic care concepts into their daily practice. The methods taught will be able to be used to improve the patient or caregiver’s knowledge to better manage the patient’s illness and thereby improve the patient’s quality of life and decreasing hospitalizations. The presenters will identify which strategies work well and determine which strategies do not work.

Objectives:

  • Identify basics of implementing a Chronic Care Model in home setting
  • Discuss implementation of a Caregiver Education Program
  • Describe sustainability

Faculty: Diane Gotebiowski, DPT, Physical Therapist/Chronic Care Coordinator, Eddy Visiting Nurse Association, Troy, NY; Patrick Archambeault, RN, MS, CRNI, Director of Clinical Specialties, Eddy Visiting Nurse Association, Troy, NY

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.5 nursing CEs; 1.5 CPEs (NASBA/SKA)

Track: Clinical
Audience: | HH | HOS | NUR | PD | TH


602. We Have to Comply with Medicare CoPs? But We’re a Pediatric Agency!

In this presentation, the challenges of an agency specializing in pediatric hourly care may face in obtaining Medicare Certification through accreditation will be discussed. The presenters will share their experience with this process and the steps taken to prepare for and successfully achieve Medicare Certification and Accreditation Commission for Health Care Accreditation as a pediatric agency.

Objectives:

  • Identify the different challenges a pediatric agency may have when seeking accreditation
  • Describe the preparation required prior to notification for readiness for survey
  • Discuss how to achieve and maintain the required census without significant loss of revenue

Faculty: Tracy Gorter, RN, Administrator, Ultimate Nursing Services, Sheldon, IA; Jan Miller, RN, BSN, Compliance Officer, Ultimate Nursing Services, West Des Moines, IA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.5 nursing CEs; 1.5 CPEs (NASBA/SKA)

Track: Clinical
Audience: | HH | HOS| PD |

 

700 Series – Saturday, November 2, 2:30 – 4pm

701. PALS-HF: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Advanced Heart Failure

The PALS-HF program was developed in response to the need to find a better way to care for patients with advanced heart failure. The program uses the hospice IDG model and demonstrates the benefits of such a strategy. Advanced heart failure management is improved by utilizing a truly interdisciplinary team approach to maximize the patient’s comfort, functional capacity, and ability to stay at home.

Objectives:

  • Identify patients who meet criteria for advanced heart failure
  • Demonstrate the benefits of a team approach using the hospice IDG model
  • Explain the competing needs of the healthcare system and how to create a win-win solution

Faculty: Ric Baxter, MD, FAAHPM, Director of Palliative Care Services, St. Luke's University Health Network, Bethlehem, PA; Helen Smith, MS, RN, CNL, Heart Failure Outpatient Coordinator, St. Luke's University Health Network, Nazareth, PA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.5 nursing CEs; 1.5 CPEs (NASBA/SKA)

Track: Clinical
Audience: | HH | HOS | NUR | PHY | TH


702. Improving Outcomes Through Effective Communication

To meet the needs of their referral sources, agencies must find effective strategies to decrease patient re-hospitalizations. Agencies and their clinicians need many tools and techniques to whittle their hospitalization rates to lower levels than their competitors, communication being a primary one. SBAR communication was first developed by Kaiser Permanante as a communication technique to decrease medical errors. This presentation will provide participants with a fresh approach to educating clinicians on SBAR communication.

Objectives:

  • Discuss issues and barriers to effective communication between home health clinicians and physicians
  • Describe how to prepare for and follow-through on SBAR communication
  • Apply SBAR communication to specific home health situations

Faculty: Mary Narayan, MSN, RN, HHCNS-BC, COS-C, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Narayan Associates, Vienna, VA

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.5 nursing CEs; 1.5 CPEs (NASBA/SKA)

Track: Clinical
Audience: | HH | NUR | TH

 

800 Series – Saturday, November 2, 4:15 – 5:45pm

801. Home Care Aides: Essential Partners in Chronic Disease Management and Transitional Care Coordination

Home care aides play an essential role in providing care to consumers with chronic diseases. This session will review several initiatives within the Affordable Care Act that relate to chronic disease management and transitional care coordination within the home health setting — and describe how agencies can enhance the role of home care aides in supporting patients with chronic diseases and transitional care.

Objectives:

  • Review several initiatives within of the Affordable Care Act that relate to chronic disease management and transitional care coordination within the home health setting
  • Define care transitions and the role of home health agencies and aides
  • Interpret the aide's role is supporting patientís involvement with Transitional Care

Faculty: Lisa Gurgone, MSPA, Executive Director, MA Council for Home Care Aide Services, Waltham, MA; Wendy Drastal, RN, MBA, FNP, Vice President, HomeCare, Inc., Lawrence, MA; Robert Dean, BSN, RN, Vice President, All Care Resources, Lynn, MA;

Course Level: Intermediate; 1.5 nursing CEs; 1.5 CPEs (NASBA/SKA)

Track: Clinical
Audience: | HH | NUR | PD |











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